Stop Fearing Critical Feedback — Fear Not Getting It Instead - Deepstash

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Stop Fearing Critical Feedback — Fear Not Getting It Instead

https://doist.com/blog/handle-negative-feedback/

doist.com

Stop Fearing Critical Feedback — Fear Not Getting It Instead
Negative feedback is a gift few people take advantage of. Learn how to seek out criticism and effectively use it to strengthen your skills and career.

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Getting Negative Feedback

Getting Negative Feedback

... is not the best thing to happen at work. It normally leads to a racing mind, emotional discomfort and increased blood pressure.

We may try to defend ourselves, or brush aside the feedback. We can also be stuck in a loop of negative thoughts.

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It’s Not Personal

Unless it is completely uncalled for, negative feedback generally has the intention of informing us about our areas of improvement. If feedback isn’t provided, you may not grow and improve. If no one tells you that you are doing something wrong, you will keep doing it wrongly forever.

Providing timely feedback may be a sign that the manager cares and wants you to improve.

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Don’t Shoot The Messenger

One should not be defensive when provided with negative feedback, and understand that it is for our own good.

One needs to act on the feedback by approaching it from a neutral and objective standpoint, not taking it as a personal attack. Instead of reacting, just pause and listen. Reflect on the feedback, giving yourself some time and space to respond with a level head.

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How To Accept Constructive Feedback

  1. Specify exactly whose opinion you are worried about.
  2. Identify the source of your fear.
  3. Don’t get defensive as a reflex action.
  4. Drill through the talk to find the real areas of concern.
  5. Politely disagree with anything you think isn’t right.
  6. Maintain a balanced posture and remain civil.
  7. Think about how you will be able to handle it.
  8. Remember that perceptions and opinions can change.
  9. Check your existing belief patterns.

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Learn and Improvise

Develop an attitude to learn and improvise, every day. Regular negative feedback tapers our sensitive, reactive nature by making us thick-skinned and takes us on the path to make ourselves better.

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Ask For Feedback

  1. Set up a 1-on-1 meeting with your boss proactively and ask for feedback.
  2. Feel the discomfort and endure it, removing any initial fear or resistance.
  3. Listen to understand, not to blurt out your defence.
  4. Express your gratitude to the person giving the feedback.
  5. Regularly ask for advice with your bosses and peers.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Negative Feedback

Negative feedback is a more important component of the feedback cycle than positive feedback. 92% of people say in a study that negative feedback improves workplace performance.

Why are people scared of Feedback

Normally people react with caution and fear towards negative feedback, but it is much better than no feedback at all.

Informing the colleague/subordinate/client/customer or individual about something that is not working, is always beneficial, and builds transparency and trust.

Check how it impacts the person

The fundamental goal of giving feedback is to help the person you’re giving it to. They should realize that you are not trying to make them feel bad, and this is an exercise to help make them better.

How it impacts each individual is going to be different so a tailor-made approach is required. 

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3. Be Specific With Your Feedback

The more specific your feedback, the more actionable it is for the one receiving it. Example: Asking for an article on communication is vague while asking for one on public speaking is speci...

4. Comment On Actionable Things

To help people improve talk about things they can do something about, rather than those out of their control. Critiquing the former makes your criticism constructive; critiquing the latter makes the person feel bad as they can’t do anything about it, even if they want to.

Understand the person’s situation and his/her objectives, then provide your critique based on that. And if you need to talk about something out of their control, balance it out by talking about things they can control.

5. Give Improvement Recommendations

Give recommendations on what the person can do to improve so they have a clear idea of what you have in mind and get a strong call-to-action.

With your recommendations, (a) be specific with your suggestions and (b) briefly explain the rationale behind the recommendation. Also, try to limit examples to one per point to make your case more impactful.

Tips for giving negative feedback

  • Be direct by avoiding the feedback"sanwich"(which can dilute the message and sounds insincere);
  • Don't let criticism accumulate: schedule weekly check-ins with your t...