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What can Aristotle teach us about the routes to happiness? - Edith Hall | Aeon Essays

https://aeon.co/essays/what-can-aristotle-teach-us-about-the-routes-to-happiness

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What can Aristotle teach us about the routes to happiness? - Edith Hall | Aeon Essays
In the Western world, only since the mid-18th century has it been possible to discuss ethical questions publicly without referring to Christianity. Modern thinking about morality, which assumes that gods do not exist, or at least do not intervene, is in its infancy.

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One of the reasons why Stoicis...
One of the reasons why Stoicism is enjoying a revival today is that it gives concrete answers to moral questions.

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Aristotle gave us an alternative conception of happiness

Aristotle gave us an alternative conception of happiness

It cannot be acquired by pleasurable experiences but only by identifying and realizing our own potential, moral and creative, in our specific environments, with our particular family, friends and colleagues, and helping others to do so. 

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