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3 Practical Tips To Stay Active At Work

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https://www.huffpost.com/entry/3-practical-tips-to-stay-active-at-work_b_5a0f5ed1e4b023121e0e92a1

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3 Practical Tips To Stay Active At Work
It's easy to stay in bed and watch Netflix, eat your favorite midnight snack, or sit in your 9-5 office desk without getting the appropriate amount of exercise. Did you know that less than 5 percent of adults participate in 30 minutes of physical activity every day?

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Less than 5 % of adults...

... participate in 30 minutes of physical activity every day.

More than 80 percent of adults fail to meet the guidelines for both aerobic and muscle-strengthening activities, ac...

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Staying physically active

... can reduce your chances of coronary heart disease, high blood pressure, and type 2 diabetes. 

It can also give you more energy, help you handle stress, and activate your mi...

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Implement a Workout Session

Implement a workout session in your organization, such as a free cycling session every month or a discount to a yoga class.

It’s even better if you can make this physical activity a commu...

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Move Around Every Now and Then

If you’re feeling sleepy or unmotivated at work, get up and walk around the office for a couple of minutes. Try to walk to the nearby coffee shop or take the stairs instead of the elevator. ...

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Customize a Personal Workout Plan

  • If you’re a morning person, motivate yourself to take a jog before work. Working out early in the morning jump starts your metabolism, regulates your body, and avoids the afternoon...

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Exercise also has a psychological benefit of making us feel great.

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Unintended consequences

Unintended consequences

As we face weeks in lockdown, we seem to be sitting a whole lot more. Sitting for over six hours for days can cause a set of health problems. It can create cardio-metabolic problems and create i...

Schedule “movement breaks” 

Set a timer once an hour to remind you to move. Get up and move your body, walk up and down the stairs, or take a brisk loop around the block.

The movement needs to be reasonably active and needs to get you out of breath. Afterward, you will feel more productive.

Find an activity you love

Most people can find an activity that they enjoy. It could be walking the dog, doing pilates, or playing in the garden.

Find the activity you like and get value from and do that.

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Excessive sitting

Sitting for an extended period is linked with obesity, type 2 diabetes, and an increased risk of death from heart disease and cancer.

Excessive sitting may also slow metabolism, whi...

Just 30 minutes of activity...

... on 5 days each week (going to the gym, cycling to work, or going for a lunchtime walk) could prevent 1 in 12 deaths globally.

Injecting physical activity into your working day could reduce some of the health risks that are elevated by being sedentary.

Cycle or walk to work

  • Cycling to work has been linked with a reduced risk of death from all causes, and a lower cancer risk.
  • Both cycling and walking to work have also been associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease.
  • People who walk or cycle to work have a lower body mass index (BMI) and body fat percentage in midlife than those who commute by car.
  • Those who actively commute to work also benefit from improved well-being and report feeling more able to concentrate and under less strain.

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