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5 Mindsets that Create Success | Mark Manson

https://markmanson.net/5-mindsets-that-create-success

markmanson.net

5 Mindsets that Create Success | Mark Manson
Here are five stories from five different people that reveal the mindsets of the most successful among us.1. You Always Have a Choice Ursula Burns was raised by her single mother in the projects of New York in the 1960s and '70s.

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You Always Have a Choice

You have no control over things like the place you were born, your biological sex, the situation of your family or your skin color. These things will obviously impact your life in major ways.

But while you may not be to blame for your situation, you are always responsible for figuring out how to deal with your situation.

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Chuck Close

"Inspiration is for amateurs. The rest of us just show up and get to work. Every great idea I’ve ever had grew out of work itself.”

Chuck Close

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Adopt a Bias Towards Action

Most people's approach to work motivation goes like this: they wait to be inspired, then they get to work.

But successful people don’t sit around and wait for inspiration. They just show up and get to work.

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Let Go of the Need to Be Right

Everyone is almost certainly wrong about pretty much everything. And we can never be 100% sure we’re right about anything.

We can only learn from our observations and hopefully be a little less wrong.

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See the World for What It Is

... not for what you wish it could be.

Appear to human nature rather than railing against it. You can’t change other people’s behavior by appealing to their moral code. The opposite will happen.

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Define Success Internally

... not externally. The modern culture ideas that "more is better" and that "we can have it all" are toxic.

Happiness isn't something you should pursue for its own sake. In fact,  trying to “feel good” all the time will only make you feel miserable.

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Logical Fallacies

Logical Fallacies

Logic is fundamental to most of humanity’s knowledge, but there are common fallacies in logic and reasoning, errors of judgement which happen due to:

  1. Our assumptions based on what we...

Correlation And Causation

If two incidents or things happen at around the same time does not mean that one thing is the result of the other. Often many things occur at the same time yet are completely unrelated.

A correlation of data, like:

1) Increase in social media usage, and

2) Increase in anxiety and depression

does not mean that one set of data is caused by the other.

The Slippery Slope

The Slippery Slope fallacy is a mistaken belief that one relatively mild unaddressed problem or allowance will automatically lead to other negative consequences.

The mind races on to the next negative consequence like a downward spiral, creating fear and anxiety.

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Alkaline water

Alkaline water

Alkaline water - water that has been treated to have a higher pH level than the 6.5-7.5 pH range - is experiencing a surge in popularity.

There are a variety of alkaline water brands on t...

Marketing claims

Marketing claims behind alkaline water are based on the acid-ash hypothesis. The idea is that eating certain foods, like meat, dairy, and eggs, results in acid ash in your body, which increases your acid levels and causes health problems.

While there are some poorly designed studies that suggest alkaline water confers health benefits, there is no rigorous scientific evidence to support this belief.

The science behind blood pH

You can't change the pH of your body by drinking alkaline water. Your body regulates its blood pH in a very narrow margin. If your pH varied too much, you wouldn't survive. 

However, your diet does affect the pH of your urine. Most people's urine is about 6, which is acidic and not a problem. Alkaline may make your urine less acidic, but it doesn't make a difference to your health.

#1 New York Times Bestseller “Significant...The book is both instructive and surprisingly moving.” —The New York Times Ray Dalio, one of the world’s most successful investors and entrepreneurs, shares the unconventional principles that he’s developed, refined, and used over the past forty years to create unique results in both life and business—and which any person or organization can adopt to help achieve their goals. In 1975, Ray Dalio founded an investment firm, Bridgewater Associates, out of his two-bedroom apartment in New York City. Forty years later, Bridgewater has made more money for its clients than any other hedge fund in history and grown into the fifth most important private company in the United States, according to Fortune magazine. Dalio himself has been named to Time magazine’s list of the 100 most influential people in the world. Along the way, Dalio discovered a set of unique principles that have led to Bridgewater’s exceptionally effective culture, which he describes as “an idea meritocracy that strives to achieve meaningful work and meaningful relationships through radical transparency.” It is these principles, and not anything special about Dalio—who grew up an ordinary kid in a middle-class Long Island neighborhood—that he believes are the reason behind his success. In Principles, Dalio shares what he’s learned over the course of his remarkable career. He argues that life, management, economics, and investing can all be systemized into rules and understood like machines. The book’s hundreds of practical lessons, which are built around his cornerstones of “radical truth” and “radical transparency,” include Dalio laying out the most effective ways for individuals and organizations to make decisions, approach challenges, and build strong teams. He also describes the innovative tools the firm uses to bring an idea meritocracy to life, such as creating “baseball cards” for all employees that distill their strengths and weaknesses, and employing computerized decision-making systems to make believability-weighted decisions. While the book brims with novel ideas for organizations and institutions, Principles also offers a clear, straightforward approach to decision-making that Dalio believes anyone can apply, no matter what they’re seeking to achieve. Here, from a man who has been called both “the Steve Jobs of investing” and “the philosopher king of the financial universe” (CIO magazine), is a rare opportunity to gain proven advice unlike anything you’ll find in the conventional business press.

Principles = Fundamental Truths

Principles = Fundamental Truths
  • Principles are essential truths that work as the foundations for the behavior that leads you where you want in life.
  • Those principles that are most valuable come f...

Pre-Packaged Principles

Your principles should reflect the values you truly believe in.

While it isn’t always a bad thing to use the principles of someone else (it’s hard to come up with your own, and often much wisdom has gone into those already created), adopting pre-packaged principles without much reflection can expose you to the risk of inconsistency with your true values.

Principles In Relationships

Your principles will influence your standards of behavior. In relationships with other people, your and their principles will decide how you collaborate.

People who have shared values and principles get along. People who don’t share values and principles, experience misunderstandings and conflict with one another. Most of the times in relationships, our principles are ambiguous.