A network of auditory cortex nerves (the corticofugal network) helps with the recognition and cataloguing of the different audio patterns.

If a pattern matches with a familiar one already in the brain, it releases dopamine, which is the main reason why (your favourite) music is so emotionally intense. Sounds are pleasurable because they match something already inside us.

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Self Improvement

  • Liking, recognizing, or remembering new information and patterns is harder for the brain, and listening to new music is no exception.
  • Our brains resist the unfamiliarity of life, as change is always feared, with the uncertain and the new being relatively less attractive than the old and familiar.
  • Old music (stuff we have listened to in the past) is therefore soothing, comfortable and familiar.
Listening To New Music
  • Around the age of 30-35, when people have settled into life, the music stops being something to experience, and more of something to remember.
  • Listening to new music can be a ‘risky’ way to invest your time and attention, as you may or may not like it. Most people who are adults or in the middle ages have their younger days packed nicely in a playlist, having all that they could possibly need in terms of music.

People can get angry, even riotous when they are presented with something they don’t know or recognize.

Much before the phrase ‘confirmation bias’ became mainstream, most of us have been practising it in the things we like, be it clothing brands, beauty ideas or music. We all are trapped in the echo chambers where we love the things we know well, just because they are familiar, and therefore lovable.

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