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5 signs you need to rethink your career

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https://www.fastcompany.com/90248181/5-signs-you-need-to-rethink-your-career

fastcompany.com

5 signs you need to rethink your career
Even people who love their jobs may find themselves bored or feeling dissatisfied from time to time. In fact, boredom is the top reason that people leave their jobs, according to a 2018 survey by Korn Ferry. Roughly one-third said that they were looking for a new job to find a new challenge.

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All areas of your life are affected

When your job is affecting your mental and emotional health, so that anger and depression overwhelm you or bleed over into other areas of your life, it’s time to consider a change.

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A toxic workplace

It can have a negative impact on your happiness and job performance.

Studies found that ostracism, bad leadership, harassment, and bullying have direct negative effects on job productivity. A...

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Not aligned with your values

If your job is not aligned with your values, you'll end up questioning the possibility of doing it for the next 15, 20, or 30 years.

The good part about it is the fact that this will point yo...

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Not moving forward

When you feel stuck and can't get out of that state, your situation becomes problematic.

When this happens, make an effort to find happiness focal points: concentrate on 3 good things that ha...

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Feeling out of control

If your work routinely throws your life into chaos, or you don’t feel as if you have any way out of a bad situation, it could be a sign that you need a change, even if it’s a challenge to make it.

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Following protocol

Schedule a time with your supervisor to break the news. Be aware that sharing the news with the office grapevine might cause the news to leak prematurely before you formally give notice.

It's...

Your future-focused "why"

Your supervisor will probably ask you why you are leaving.

Make sure your reason for leaving is opportunity-focused and aspirational and not because you are running away from something. Reasons may be taking on a more prominent role, learning new skills, working in a new industry or relocation.

Weighting counteroffers

Research found that while 58% of employers extend counteroffers, the average employee who accepts them stays less than two years in a company.

Keep the focus on your new opportunities and suggest that you remain in touch and explore the chance to return at a future time.

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Starting with you

Focus on you first as the foundation. Your beliefs, attitude, and energy will determine your success. Spend time building up your confidence. 

  • Jot down your compet...

Thinking like a historian

Your resume is a marketing document, not an autobiography that details every past role and responsibility. Your objective it trying to prompt a purchase decision, which is to invite you in for an interview.

Delve into job boards and companies' careers pages. Pull a few postings, and find what theme or criteria keep coming up. For instance, if you continually find that they need someone who can solve complex problems and navigate ambiguity, and you can do that, then put it in your resume.

Looking at the big picture

Remember all of the skills you bring to the table. If you're applying for a project management role, consider highlighting the complementary skills you bring to the table. However, it should be a value add, not a random sidebar of your career.

Showing how your specific background allows you to bring a new perspective to your work will help you to stand out above other candidates.

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Feedback

Feedback

Feedback provides an opportunity to gain insights about a person's personal and professional actions.
Without feedback, we will move in the same direction without realizing our shortcomings. ...

Types of feedback

  • Positive vs. negative. Positive feedback confirms that someone is taking good action, while negative feedback shows what actions need to be corrected.
  • Formal vs. informal. Formal feedback is given on a set schedule, and informal feedback is short and follows after an action or event.
  • Annual vs. monthly
  • Verbal vs. written
  • Manager vs. peer

Effective feedback

Effective feedback is:
  • Objective. Don't let your personal feelings get in the way.
  • Timely. Feedback should follow when the event is still fresh.
  • Constructive. Give respect and show that you have their best interests in mind.
  • Actionable. Feedback must include immediate next steps.
  • Warranted. Give your employees room for mistakes and learn from them.

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