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The Kaizen Approach to Achieving Your Biggest Goal (The Philosophy of Incremental Progress)

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/the-kaizen-approach-to-achieving-your-biggest-goal_b_59bbd2a9e4b0390a1564dca4

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The Kaizen Approach to Achieving Your Biggest Goal (The Philosophy of Incremental Progress)
In a perfect world, by this time of the year, you would be halfway through your 2017 goals, right? Unfortunately, not many people can commit to a course ...

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Albert Einstein

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Stephen Covey

“Be patient with yourself. Self-growth is tender; it’s holy ground. There’s no greater investment.”

Stephen Covey

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The Small Steps That Change Your Life

Kaizen, which means continuous improvement in Japanese was originally developed by Depression-Era management gurus in the US. The Japanese embraced the idea of improving and thriving in small steps, as opposed to working on a BHAG (Big, Hairy, Audacious Goal).

The long, hard process looks difficult but is actually easy if we just focus on the small step that needs to be taken today, and do that consistently.

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Self-Improvement: 1 Percent Daily

  • We are never done improving ourselves. We need to do certain things daily to achieve and maintain our success. The first steps are not easy, but taking small actions is progress, while not taking any action isn’t.
  • Kaizen is about the 1 percent improvement that we can focus on, and those daily 1 percent improvements compound over time.
  • Initially the improvements may not be noticeable, but in a span of months or years, the breakthrough improvements will start to be visible.

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Systems Instead Of Goals

Setting a goal is easy, just like marking a date on the calendar. The real challenge is always the willingness to accept what we need to do daily to achieve those goals.

We need to design a system that has to be practiced daily, as the commitment to a process provides the compound effect. Example: Learning should not be limited to college, but should be a lifelong system imbibed in your pursuit of knowledge, enriching your life and making you a better person.

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“You will never change your life until you change something you do daily.”

Mike Murdock

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Little Things Into Big Things

When we improve a little on a daily basis, big things occur over time. We need to stop focusing on radical, sudden improvements, as quick-fixes aren’t lasting anyway.

Consistent and sustainable gains are only achieved by small, incremental improvements on a daily basis.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Kaizen — Japanese for continuous improvement

It means focusing on consistent improvements in your life, no matter how small the steps you take towards your goals. Becoming even 1% better everyday is a simple, practical way to achieve big goal...

Quick hacks won't bring faster results

Instead of reading every self-improvement post, focus on doing the actual work that needs to be done. You can inspire yourself to take action. Committing to the hard, long process is the only way though. 

The problem with big goals

... is that they can be intimidating. They can paralyze you into inaction.

The big picture can be overwhelming, but in little parts, it seems achievable. Every step forward brings you ...

Tom Clancy

Tom Clancy

“An overnight success is ten years in the making.”

There are no “overnight successes”

There are no quick hacks that bring faster results.

Every incredibly successful person you know today has been through the boring, mundane, time-tested process that eventually brings success. 

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Goal setting

Goal setting

Is the act of selecting a target or objective you wish to achieve.

Goal setting is not only about choosing the rewards you want to enjoy, but also the costs you are willing to pay t...

The Rudders and Oars Metaphor

It helps clarify the difference between SYSTEMS and GOALS:
  • Your goals are like the rudder on a small rowboat. They set the direction and determine where you go. 
  • If you commit to one goal, then the rudder stays put and you continue moving forward. 
  • If you flip-flop between goals, then the rudder moves all around and it is easy to find yourself rowing in circles.
  • If the rudder is your goal, then the oars are your process for achieving it. While the rudder determines your direction, it is the oars that determine your progress.

Example: If you’re a writer, your goal is to write a book. Your system is the writing schedule that you follow each week.

How to Set Goals You'll Actually Follow

  1. Ruthlessly Eliminate Your Goals. Consistently prune and trim down your goals. If you can muster the courage to prune away a few of your goals, then you create the space you need for the remaining goals to fully blossom.
  2. Stack Your Goals. Make a specific plan for when, where and how you will perform this."Networking: After I return from my lunch break, I will send one email to someone I want to meet."
  3. Set an Upper Bound. Don't focus on the minimum threshold. Instead of saying,  “I want to make at least 10 sales calls today.” rather say, “I want to make at least 10 sales calls today, but not more than 20.”