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6 Lessons From Jane Austen - On Love, Life And Writing | Writers Write

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6 Lessons From Jane Austen - On Love, Life And Writing | Writers Write
Writers Write is your one-stop writing resource. In this post, we write about 6 lessons from Jane Austen on love, life, and writing. Jane Austen , born 16 December 1775, and died 18 July 1817, is one of the most iconic authors in the English language.

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The lesson learned from the novel 'Emma'

Most of us have already heard about Jane Austen: she is a novel writer, whose masterpieces have proven timeless throughout centuries. When reading her novel 'Emma', one will certainly disco...

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The take-away from 'Northanger Abbey'

This incredible novel teaches us one important lesson worth being remembered throughout our lives: be curious. You must be curious and open to change, as only in this way you can succeed to grow.

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The lesson learned from 'Pride and Prejudice'

One of the best novels of all time, 'Pride and Prejudice' has a great lesson to teach us all: learn from your mistakes. Just as the characters admit their mistakes and act accordingly, one ...

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The take-away from 'Mansfield Park'

Austen's novel, 'Mansfield Park' comes to add up evidence to the fact that money is not everything in life. While chasing after it, in the hope that this will make us happy, we might en...

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The take-away from 'Persuasion'

The novel 'Persuasion' emphasizes something learned by almost all of us by a very early age: it is always better to trust your own gut than to blindly follow somebody else's advice. Whi...

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The lesson learned from 'Sense and Sensibility'

Now this is one novel everybody must have heard about at least once in their lives. 'Sense and sensibility' has a strong message for us all to bear in our mind: true love takes time. Knowing somebo...

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Create the conditions to write

Create the conditions to write
  • Make the time for writing. We all have those absent-minded moments in our day when we're not doing anything. If we use that time to write, we can actually get a lot done...

There's no one "right" way to write

Some people plan ahead their and outline their novels, others just jump in a wing it.Experiment, start with something and see what works for you.

Try to show up for your characters. It's not important how you do it, as long as you do it.

Find your people

  1. When you feel a bit stuck, and walking the dog or organizing the closet doesn't help, speak to a friend with a different way of thinking. Or talk to a friend who's writing a book.aaa

  2. You don't just have to stick to friends. Reach out to other writers who can talk through any issue you're having with your book.

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Our ideas of love

The differences in how people have loved throughout history suggest that our style of loving is to a significant extent determined by what the prevailing environment dictates.

It is through ...

What is lacking in art

... are crucial elements of wisdom, realism and maturity. Our love stories excite us to expect things of love that are neither very possible nor very practical.

We learn to judge ourselves by the hopes and expectations fostered by a misleading artistic medium.

How love stories affect us

Emma Bovary in Madame Bovary (1856) spent her childhood immersed in Romantic fiction. As a result, she’s expecting that her husband will be someone who understands her soul perfectly.

When she does get married to the kind, thoughtful but human. But she is quickly bored by the routines of married life. She is convinced that her life has gone profoundly wrong for one central reason: because it’s so different from what the novels she knows told her it would be.

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Creating words

Creating words

In times past, when circumstances demanded new ways of expression, it was often female writers who invented new words.

The word 'frustrating' makes its first appearance in print...

Get your ‘-ness’ on

The suffix '-ness' can transform a plain word into something stranger and affectingly abstract. For example, 'dark' is factual, whereas 'darkness' is more graphic and poetic.

Other words that already follow this form: the unvisitedness of our parents and grandparents. The unembracedness of our friends. The egglessness of our pantries.

You are what you '-r'

To show the depths of your connection with a place or feeling, simply adding an 'r' or an 'er' to the end of a noun can show a new existential title.
Jane Austen christened a group of random gamblers around a casino table, all coming from the 'outside,' as 'outsiders.' In her novel Emma, she turned the word 'sympathy' into 'sympathizer,' the first recorded use of that word.

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