Detailed Guide to Local Cuisine of the Philippines | Guid... - Deepstash

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Detailed Guide to Local Cuisine of the Philippines | Guid...

guidetothephilippines.ph

Most Filipino dishes began with their creators making use of whatever ingredients they could find to create a dish

With the Philippines being an archipelagos, Filipino cuisine is highly local a...

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Filipino food is known as “one of the world’s earliest fusion cuisines,”

heavily influenced by Chinese cuisine, brought along by the traders and later by the Cantonese and immigrants from the Fujian region of China.

influenced by the cuisine of its colonizers: the Spanish, who ruled t...

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  • Most Filipino dishes are named after cooking methods, not after specific ingredients/dishes

"Adobo" refers to the technique of stewing in vinegar with peppercorns and bay leaf. The word "Adobo" could mean a host of different dishes: chicken adobo, pork adobo, squid, watercres...

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By virtue of it (Filipino food) being local, regional, seasonal and being influenced bh a number of foreign cuisines, cataloging Filipino dishes can be challenging.

Thid also means that it is difficult to truly define and sum up Filipino food in just a few sentences.

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The Philippines has one of the most varied selections of vinegar in the world: coconut sap, pineapple, sugar cane, palm, and banana among others

Filipino cuisine is best enjoyed with rice. Every meal is paired with one form of rice or another; even snacks and breakfast

Filipinos could...

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Filipino cuisine encourages the use of sawsawan (dipping sauce believed to make the food more appetizing & gets rid of any unwanted smells) : usually a combination of calamansi (Phil. lime), soy/fish sauce, vinegar,onions, garlic, chilies

Some unique condiments of ...

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Food is such a big part of Filipino culture that you are usually greeted with, “Kumain ka na ba?” (Have you eaten?) and you will be served some food regardless of your answer.

The term “snacks” is simply an excuse, in reality these additional meals are just as filling as any other meal dur...

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Most Filipino street foods are deep fried, poked through with a skewer and dipped in a sauce.

fish, squid balls (deep fried ground fish/squid meat), kwek-kwek (quail eggs coated in an orange batter and deep fried) and kikiam

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LUZON

The most popular culinary destinations in Luzon:

  • Pampanga  - the Culinary Capital of the Philippines that serves a mix of savory dishes. 
  • The Bicol region...

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Adobo - the cooking method of stewing in vinegar, peppercorns & bay leaf.

Modern versions add soy sauce but plenty of regions in Luzon don’t.

Variations (addition of):

  • turmeric - Batangas
  • fish sauce - Cavite
  • coconut milk (sometimes) - Bicol region

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Luzon Dishes: Sinigang

Sinigang is a soup soured by a sour fruit or leaf.

The meat can be pork, beef, salmon or shrimp cooked in a broth with vegetables like kang kong (swamp cabbage), radish, Chinese long beans, tomatoes, and onions.

In some areas in Luzon, sinigang double as an appetizer as they love to c...

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Luzon Dishes: Sisig

Originating in Pampangga,“sisig” comes from an old Filipino word “sisigan,” meaning to “munch on something sour”.

The most common version is made with pig’s ears and face; boiled, then grilled, chopped and served with onions,chili,liver and calamansi.

Sisig was originally a

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One of the more humble Filipino dishes

a vegetable stew usually consists of eggplant, string beans, okra, bitter melon and squash and it is usually flavored with bagoong (strong shrimp paste or fish sauce).

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"Pancit" refers to the noodles

one of the many influences of the Chinese

there are hundreds, if not thousands, of pancit varieties in the Philippines, depending on the region.

Most ...

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“Halo” - Filipino word for mix

"halo-halo" = a mix of preserved & sweetened fruits (banana,sweet potato), legumes (chickpeas,white beans) and gels (nata, kaong, jellies), sago (tapioca pearls) halayang ube (purple yam jam), w/crushed ice & evaporated milk

perfect antidote to the hot ...

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Some of the tastiest and most iconic Filipino dishes can be found in Visayas. Lechos is regarded as the creme de la creme of all dishes and is often referenced as the food of the rich people to show the difference in the income and lifestyle of the rich and the poor.

Majority of destinatio...

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A celebration dish, found in almost every feast/party

refers to the method of cooking meat on a spit over an open flame

can refer to a whole pig/just the belly;calf,chicken

Lechon baboy/ whole roast pig-most common

Whole pig is stuffed w/ lemongrass,onions & garlic w/sea s...

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one of the Philippines’ most popular noodle soup dishes

Originated in La Paz, Iloilo City

egg noodles, beef & pork meat, liver, marrow & intestines, in a pork & beef broth w/ a hint of bagoong. Fried garlic & chicharon (fried pork rinds) are also added

Broth has rich umami flav...

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chicken marinated in ginger to infuse the chicken with flavor, vinegar and lemongrass, skewered and then grilled over open charcoal flame for smokiness

As they are grilled, they are brushed with oil flavored with garlic and annatto seed.

“Manukan Country.” (chicken country), Bacolod -...

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this black dish of pork and pig innards -- stewed in fresh pig blood seasoned w/ garlic, onion and oregano; eaten w/ puto (rice cake) or steamed rice -- is a comfor dish for many Filipinos

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  1. Adobo
  2. Lechon
  3. Sisig
  4. Crispy pata
  5. Chicken inasal
  6. Taba ng talangka
  7. Pancit palabok
  8. Bulalo
  9. Arroz caldo
  10. Fish tinola
  11. Kare-kare
  12. Kamaro
  13. Ilocos Empanada
  14. Sinigang
  15. Tapa
  16. Dinuguan at p...

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From being a vegetable salad how did sisig become a meat dish?

A popular theory:

Under the US occupation in the late 1800s, American Naval Forces would throw out leftover pig parts. The Filipinos would save the discarded head and eventually made a di...

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