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9 Telltale Signs You Have Impostor Syndrome

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https://www.inc.com/melody-wilding/9-telltale-signs-you-have-impostor-syndrome.html

inc.com

9 Telltale Signs You Have Impostor Syndrome
They worry that they'll be exposed as untalented fakers and say their accomplishments have been due to luck. This psychological phenomenon, known as Impostor Syndrome, reflects is the core belief that you are an inadequate, incompetent, and a failure -- despite evidence that indicates you're skilled and successful.

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Impostor Syndrome

Is a psychological phenomenon that reflects the core belief that you are an inadequate, incompetent, and a failure, despite evidence that indicates you're skilled and successful.

Impos...

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Causes of the Impostor Syndrome

From a psychological standpoint, it may be influenced by certain factors early in life, particularly the development of certain beliefs and attitude towards success and one's self-worth.

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Signs You Have Impostor Syndrome

  • You don't think you deserve success.
  • You think you're a fake and you're going to be found out.
  • You attribute your success to luck.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Impostor Syndrome

It is a psychological phenomenon that reflects the belief that you’re an inadequate and incompetent failure despite evidence that indicates you’re skilled and quite successful.

The Perfectionist

They set the bar excessively high for themselves and when they fail to reach their goals, they experience major self-doubt. For this type, success is rarely satisfying because they believe they could’ve done even better.

But that’s not productive. Learning to celebrate achievements is essential if you want to avoid burnout and find contentment.

The Superwoman/man

Impostor workaholics are actually addicted to the validation that comes from working, not to the work itself. They push themselves to work harder, to measure up with their colleagues.

Start drifting away from external validation. No one should have more power to make you feel good about yourself than you.

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The Impostor Syndrome

The Impostor Syndrome

It is the feeling that you are not worthy of your designation, title, position or success.

Your accomplishments may be due to luck or effort, but you feel you lack the talent or skill ...

The Reality of Impostor Syndrome

  • The impostor syndrome is like a nagging feeling that our success might be due to luck, good timing, or even a computer error.
  • It makes us think we have done nothing, and that we secretly are a fraud for taking undue credit.
  • The person suffering from an impostor syndrome lives in fear that soon the 'secret' about his true nature will be uncovered.

Self-Efficacy is the Answer

The antidote to the impostor syndrome is self-efficacy, which is about learning one's own value.

Self-efficacy is described as a perceived ability to succeed at a particular task. It means having rock-solid confidence, a supercharged belief in your ability. 

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Impostor syndrome

Impostor syndrome

It's the idea that you’ve only succeeded due to luck, and not because of your talent or qualifications.

What causes the impostor syndrome

We have no idea what causes the impostor syndrome. But we all suffer from it It may have to with:

  • Personality traits, like anxiety or neuroticism
  • Family or behavioral causes, like childhood memories (such as feeling that your grades were never good enough for your parents)
  • The environment or institutionalized discrimination.

How to deal with impostor syndrome

  • Acknowledge the thoughts and put them in perspective: Simply observing that thought as opposed to engaging it can be helpful.
  • Reframe your thoughts: The difference between someone who experiences impostor syndrome and someone who does not is how they respond to challenges.
  • Share what you’re feeling with trusted friends or mentors: People who have more experience can reassure you that what you’re feeling is normal.