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A History of Pizza | History Today

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A History of Pizza | History Today
The world’s most popular fast food has ancient roots, but it was a royal seal of approval that set it on the path to global domination.

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The world's favorite fast food

The world's favorite fast food

Pizza is the world's favorite fast food, with some three billion pizza sold every year in the US alone.

The story of how pizza became so popular reveals much about the history ...

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History of Pizza

Pizza - pieces of flatbread, topped with savories - was a simple and tasty meal for those who could not afford plates.

  • Early pizzas appear in Virgil's Aeneid. Aeneas and his crew ate t...

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Pizzas were scorned

For a long time, pizzas were associated with poverty and scorned by food writers.

In 1831, Samuel Morse described pizza as a ‘species of the most nauseating cake … covered over with sli...

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Pizzas gain popularity

While on a visit to Naples in 1889, King Umberto I and Queen Margherita grew tired of the complicated French dishes they were served. Three sorts of pizza were offered to the queen: one with lar...

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The migration

  • From the 1930s onward, a number of Neapolitans moved northward, taking their cuisine with them.
  • When Allied soldiers invaded Italy in 1943, they so liked the pizza that they asked ...

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The discovery of sushi

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The arrival of sushi in Japan

Around 718 sushi had finally reached Japan, after having been discovered and consumed in Thailand and Vietnam for quite a while. While glorified for its taste, it was found unworthy because of its smell.

Actually it was the Muromachi period, between 1338 and 1573, that made sushi lose its smell by changing the way people cooked it. During the 12th century, an update was going to be made in regards to the preparation of sushi, which eventually led to it being consumed in big amount by artisans, warriors, merchants and nobles.

The different ways of cooking sushi

  • During the 17th century, sushi started being cooked in a faster, however still delicious way: haya-zushi involved using vinegard and let it work its wonders on the fish for a few days.
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Plan ahead

Before you shop for the self-isolation period:

  • Consider the foods your family likes, your food preparation methods and the time and energy you will have for preparing meals.

While at the supermarket

... during the pandemic:

  • Use disinfecting wipes for your hands and grocery cart handle, and then make sure you put the wipe in the trash.
  • Supermarkets are running low on many items. Be ready with a back-up plan if an ingredient you need is unavailable.
  • Use contactless payment or credit cards. If you have to use the payment keypad, tap the buttons and screen with your knuckle then use hand sanitizer after completing your payment.
  • Contribute to local pantries and soup kitchens, to help the less fortunate.

Eating together at home

Make meals at home a positive and fun experience:

  • Get the whole family involved. Kids can help set the table or pour the water, make the salad.
  • Try some new easy recipes, that require a few ingredients.
  • Reconnect with the family: eat together at the table or spread a blanket on the floor and have an indoor picnic.

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The Mediterranean diet

The Mediterranean diet

It is not a weight-loss regime such as the Atkins or Dukan diets. It is actually not a prescriptive diet at all, rather a pattern of eating.

It is based on a rural life where people at...

Principles of the Mediterranean diet

  • It is based on large amounts of fruit and vegetables, legumes, whole grains and especially olive oil.
  • Fish and seafood depends on how close to the sea you live.
  • Chicken, eggs and small amounts of dairy, such as cheese and yoghurt, are there in moderation.
  • The diet includes a small amount of wine with meals
  • It is quite a high-carbohydrate diet (pasta, bread and potatoes).
  • Red meat and sweets would rarely be consumed.
  • It is accompanied by quite a lot of physical activity. 

The Mediterranean diet is more than food on a plate

  • It emphasises values of hospitality, neighbourliness, intercultural dialogue and creativity, and a way of life guided by respect for diversity.
  • Shared family meals help people eat well and avoid excess, while the TV dinner habit is linked to obesity.
  • It involves a set of skills, knowledge, rituals, symbols and traditions concerning crops, harvesting, fishing, animal husbandry, conservation, processing, cooking and particularly the sharing and consumption of food.