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Could we live in a world without rules?

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https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20200220-could-we-live-in-a-world-without-rules

bbc.com

Could we live in a world without rules?
"I'm in my late 20s and I'm feeling more and more constrained by rules. From the endless signs that tell me to 'stand on the right' on escalators or 'skateboarding forbidden' in public places to all those unwritten societal rules such as the expectation that I should settle down, buy a house and have a family.

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Rules

We all feel the oppressive presence of rules. We think rules are hampering our freedom and argue that they should be broken.

It is not really the rules that are the problem, but the unjustifi...

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A life without rules

Imagine living in a world without rules. 

  • Language follows rules. Breaking away from the rules of language makes us incoherent.
  • Consider the rules of sport or games, the ...

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Anarchy

Some people would prefer a society without government, where individual freedom comes first.

However, a world that promotes anarchy is inherently unstable. Humans continually make new rules t...

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Spontaneous rule construction

Rules aren't just invented by rulers and imposed from the top down. They often arise from the needs of mutually agreeable social and economic interactions.

When people collectively have to ma...

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Arbitrary rules

If each of us had to justify each rule from scratch, we would grind to a halt. Because of rules, we are able to learn hugely complex systems of language and social norms without spending too much t...

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Rule-creep

Some rules keep being added and extended so that our individual liberty is increasingly reduced. Regulations on drug discovery can be so onerous that a potentially valuable medicine is rejected.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Simple rules

They are shortcut strategies that save time and effort by focusing our attention and simplifying the way we process information. The rules aren’t universal- they’re tailored to the particular si...

Boundary rules for better decisions

They guide the choice of what to do (and not do) without requiring a lot of time, analysis, or information. 

They work well for categorical choices, like a judge’s yes-or-no decision on a defendant’s bail, and decisions requiring many potential opportunities to be screened quickly. 

These rules also come in handy when time, convenience, and cost matter.

Prioritizing rules for better decisions

They rank options to help decide which of multiple paths to pursue.

They are especially powerful when applied to bottleneck activities - pinch-points in companies, where the number of opportunities swamps available resources, and prioritizing rules can ensure that these resources are deployed where they can have the greatest impact.

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Sports Fans

Sports Fans

Sports is a big deal across the world, with die-hard fans who are extremely emotional towards their home teams. It is hard to pinpoint the motivations of a sports fan, and why a win or a loss of a ...

Why We Love Sports

Sports psychologists have a list of why people love sports:

  • Sports carry self-esteem benefits.
  • Commercial reasons (money bets etc.).
  • Peer pressure of being part of their group.
  • Sports are exciting.
  • Sports is an aesthetically pleasing activity.
  • A venue for emotional expression.
  • Sports is an escape from real-world problems.
  • Sports provide a sense of connectedness and belonging.

Explaining Sports Appeal

  • Talent-Luck Theory: Sports appeals to a lot of people due to its ability to balance skill with randomness.
  • Mirror Neurons: Many fans are able to feel what the player is feeling, and experience the excitement first-hand in his mind, with no barrier between the self and the outside world.

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Deep Play

The End of Work in the coming decades may give way to the rise of 'Deep Play', elaborate virtual reality games mixed with religion, consumerism and other ideologies.