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Here's Why You Should Stop Boasting About Always Being Busy

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https://www.forbes.com/sites/lisaquast/2017/07/31/stop-boasting-about-always-being-busy-its-detrimental-to-your-health/

forbes.com

Here's Why You Should Stop Boasting About Always Being Busy
Being busy can be good. It can mean you're being productive and getting things done. It can also be bad and signify that you're taking on too many activities and not giving yourself enough breathing room to relax and rest. My client ran into the Starbucks 30 minutes late for our career coaching session.

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Chronic busyness

Being chronically busy can become a badge of honor. It makes you feel important.

It can also hurt your health. The long hours, stress and lack of relaxation time can result in insomnia...

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Addicted to chronic busyness

  • How would you describe your days? Would you call them hectic, chaotic, consumed in activities?
  • How does being busy make you feel? Do you enjoy the exc...

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

“Those who are wise won’t be busy, and those who are too busy can’t be wise.”

Lin Yutang

Busy as a default state

“‘Busy’ has become the new ‘Fine’.” 

When you ask somebody how they were doing, they used to answer, “Fine.” But nowadays, everybody answers, “Busy.”

Being busy is a choice

We are never forced into a lifestyle of busyness. 'Busy' is nothing but a decision we make.

Simply realize that our schedules are determined by us. 

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Social Comparison Theory

Psychology Today describes social comparison theory as, "... determining our own social and personal self-worth based on how we stack up against others we perceive as somehow faring better or worse...

What Others Think of Us

As a human being interacting with other human beings, we learn that how we show up in the world seems to matter. 

If we have learned through our own social experiences that certain patterns of behavior, such as being extraordinarily busy and constantly on-the-go lead to being successful, connected and accepted by others, then we may find it appealing to engage in those behaviors.

Busy vs. Productive

Merriam-Webster defines the word productive as, "Yielding results, benefits or profits." Essentially, it means that we have something to show for our hard work. 

Being busy has to do with an amount of time, where productivity has more to do with our use of time.

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Workaholism

A Workaholic is a person who is addicted to work, having an uncontrollable and obsessive desire to work incessantly.

Workaholism is assumed to be the same as working hard, but the two quali...

How being a Workaholic harms you

When work occupies all your time and energy, and there is a relentless need to keep working at any cost, it can have some serious side effects.

1. Sleep Troubles

2. Frequent headaches and tiredness

3. Eating disorders and upset stomach

4. Pain in the body

5. Changes in Mood

6. Burnout

Workaholics have Sleep Troubles

Work addicts experience sleep trouble, with their busy schedules, without realizing that sleep actually benefits productivity.

This sleep deprivation also leads to crankiness and memory impairment.

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Busy Being Busy

We are far too busy in ways not imagined before, though productivity hasn't increased proportionally. Studies show we have more leisure time than before but have become overwhelmed with ...

Accept Defeat

Time and resources are limited but 'everything that is to be done' is always unlimited, so there is bound to be a compromise, a trade-off.

Something will always be neglected or deprioritized, no matter what you do.

Respect your rhythms and body clocks

Humans are not a machine or a piece of equipment, that can be made to work overtime and show more productivity.

We don't work like a machine, and working more hours does not mean more actual work. If we respect our body clock and work with it, we can be more productive.

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Busyness is a myth

Although people feel much busier with work these days, the total time people are working – whether paid or otherwise – has not increased in Europe or North America in recent decades.

The illusion of busyness is caused by:

  • Economies grow and time is more valuable: Any given hour is worth more, so we experience more pressure to squeeze in more work.
  • The type of work we do has changed: We live in an “infinite world" - more incoming emails, meetings, things to read, more ideas to follow up – and digital technology means you can easily crank through them. The result, inevitably, is feeling overwhelmed.

Busyness has become the indicator of status

Though historically, the ultimate symbol of wealth, achievement and social superiority was the freedom not to work. Now we measure our worth not by the results we achieve, but by how much of our time we spend doing things. 

Productivity Shame

Productivity Shame

Work is never finished, and we are unable to disconnect from it, causing us to experience productivity shame, impacting our happiness and creativity.

The modern working pro...

The Busyness Paradox: Addicted To Being Busy

  • Personal productivity is not about all-round efficiency, and it is wrong to think about your input as that of a machine in a factory unit.
  • This is further complicated by our mistaken assumption that being in demand means that we are doing a splendid job.
  • We blur our all boundaries between our work and personal life and every minute of the day is to be kept busy as we rush to attend every meeting, cross out every task from the to-do list or to answer every email that we get.

Completion Bias

Our brain starts to favour small tasks that give a false impression of productivity (woohoo! I just sent out fifty emails!) while we neglect the large, complex but meaningful tasks.

This is known as the completion bias.

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Busy-ness is glorified

“Busy-ness” is glorified in our society. We wear our stress like a badge of honor, as if the busier we are, the more impressive we must be, and the more accomplished we must seem.

When...

Busy-ness is selfish

Being so hyper-fixed on our own stress and schedule is, in a way, selfish. It’s a way to be caught up in our own little world.

Instead, we should be encouraging ourselves and others to find a better balance in our lives and in our experiences. 

Analyze

We convince ourselves that everything we do now, will pay off when we are successful and achieve that next milestone. But, as soon as we reach that goal, we rarely bask in that success because we must be in pursuit of the next one.

Analyze the reasons as to why you are doing the things you do, and why you are reaching for the goals you are trying to achieve.

“Most people have no clue what they are doing with their time but still complain that they don’t have enough.”..."

Grant Cardone

“When the goal is merely to ‘get through’ the day as quickly as possible, life will pass full of regrets. Time becomes the great taskmaster when it should be the liberator. Time is endured rather than enjoyed.”

“When the goal is merely to ‘get through’ the day as quickly as possible, life will pass full of regrets. Time becomes the great taskmaster when it should be the liberator. Time is endured rather than enjoyed.”

Understanding time

You have all the time in the world if you know how to utilize the time you’re given.

There are no limits on time. You can complete as much work as you want — if you have the right mindset and environment

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Busyness and Creativity

Being busy all the time dials down your creativity. Being distracted doing the scheduled work in your calendar doesn't give your brain time to do any creative thinking and in turn any re...

Information Overload

We consume up to five times more information than we used to a generation before. This constant information overload drains us of our creativity and even willpower.

An avalanche of information keeps our brain mired and trapped in noise.

Addicted to Busyness

Kickstarting our creative process requires solitude, space, time and a distraction-free environment. 

Our brain then gets accustomed to constant stimulation, and we become addicted to busyness.

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Breaks keep us from getting bored

The human brain just wasn’t built for the extended focus we ask of it these days.

The fix for this unfocused condition is simple—all we need is a brief interruption (aka a break) to ge...

Breaks and brain connections

Our brains have two modes:

  • focused mode, which we use when we’re doing things like learning something new, writing or working) and 
  • diffuse mode, which is our more relaxed, daydreamy mode when we’re not thinking so hard.

The mind solves its stickiest problems while daydreaming—something you may have experienced while driving or taking a shower.

Breaks help us reevaluate our goals

When you work on a task continuously, it’s easy to lose focus and get lost in the weeds. In contrast, following a brief intermission, picking up where you left off forces you to take a few seconds to think globally about what you’re ultimately trying to achieve. 

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