deepstash

Beta

How Music Festivals Became Such a Big Business | Time

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

https://time.com/collection/woodstock50/5651255/business-of-music-festivals/

time.com

How Music Festivals Became Such a Big Business | Time
In the 50 years since Woodstock, music festivals have grown DIY, communal events into major moneymakers in a competitive industry.

5

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Music Festivals

Music Festivals

In the last 10 odd years, music festivals have grown into a massive juggernaut. There are big-ticket events with matching prices and an endless stream of world-class performers.

Origins:

...

32 SAVES


Experiential Economy

People, especially those who are tired of accumulating stuff, are now more likely to spend money on experiences. Music festivals provide such an experience, making big brands lineup for the same.

23 SAVES


The Real Experience

Streaming services like Apple Music and Spotify have changed how music is consumed, with sales of physical media now a thing of the past. Live music is the only form of ‘real’ experience, and fans ...

33 SAVES


Commercial Viability

Artists see music festivals as a better and easier way of making money, as opposed to record sales(not happening now) or long tours that are done at their own expense.

Music Festivals are no...

24 SAVES


Mainstream Or Low-Key

Many 'niche' music festivals are not meant to be mainstream and are showcased as a cultural community event, focussed on bringing like-minded people together. The booming trend is of course towards...

35 SAVES


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Postponing the 2020 Olympics

Postponing the 2020 Olympics

The postponement of Tokyo 2020 was not a decision taken lightly: it came after the pressure to cancel or delay the event due to the risks of the new virus.
The financial blow of canceling the ga...

The 1916 Summer Olympics

The Berlin Games were canceled due to the outbreak of World War I in July 1914.

Organizers initially thought that the war would be over by Christmas but an armistice was not reached until November 1918.

The 1940 and 1944 games

Tokyo and Sapporo, Japan, had been originally set to host the 1940 Olympic Games (summer and winter), making them the first non-Western cities selected to host. But the war between Japan and China started in July 1937 and made the Japanese government decide to lose their right to host the Games.
The new hosts: Helsinki, Finland (for summer) and Garmisch-Partenkirchen Germany (for winter). But the outbreak of World War II caused the events to be canceled entirely, after the Nazi invasion of Poland in September 1939. The same happened with the 1944’s Summer Olympics in London and Winter Games in Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy.

Reframe or divert

The first step in approaching a negative situation with an optimistic outlook is to accept what you can’t change.

Once you’ve done that, you have 2 options: reframe ( look ...

Savor the good

Noticing and savoring the pleasant moments and thinking, "Wow, this is really great "can strengthen positive emotions.

In general, we tend to dwell on the negative side and not notice the positive things we experience.

Set reminders

Write yourself a message on a sticky note and attach it to your computer screen at work (an inspirational quote, a reminder to smile, etc).

Small reminders like these help keep positivity front and center in your life.

3 more ideas

First impressions

In less than one-tenth of a second of seeing someone for the first time, our brain processes information about the person’s face—which leads to quick conclusions about a new acquaintance’s quali...

Know your context

It’s important to first consider where you are trying to make a good impression—whether it’s a formal job interview or a dinner date. 

Context matters. It gives you cues as to how you should dress, speak, look and behave, in a way that matches the setting you are entering to. That is a key aspects of making a good impression. 

Adjust your attitude

Try not to look bored, rude or hostile.

A useful attitude is welcoming, curious and enthusiastic: smile, make eye contact long enough to notice the color of that person’s eyes, sit without crossing your arms or legs. This project a positive, open warm impression.

4 more ideas