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How To Be Objective When You're Emotionally Invested

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https://www.fastcompany.com/3039453/how-to-be-objective-when-youre-emotionally-invested

fastcompany.com

How To Be Objective When You're Emotionally Invested
Objectivity is one of those traits we all like to think we have. After all, the best course of action in any given situation is to consider the facts and circumstances, and then arrive at the best possible decision. That's easy, right? Not so much. The reality is we all have biases.

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The Limits of Objectivity

If you think you're really objective, you're wrong. We all like to think we are objective, but the reality is we all have biases that interfere with our ability to evaluate a situation accurately.

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Find Your Weak Spots

We leave clues when we're less objective.

If you're getting irritated or highly emotional about a topic, you're probably not thinking rationally or objectively. You might be emotionally inve...

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Seek Out Different Opinions

Seek Out Different Opinions

The best way to become more objective is to broaden the input you're receiving.

Build a network of people you respect who holds different viewpoints from your own. Seek out their opinions...

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Check Your Personality Type

If you're naturally a people pleaser, you may be making decisions partly because you want to avoid unpleasantness with others. It can prevent you from weighing the facts based on their merits.

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Invite Other Views

When you think you know everything about a subject, it's time to check your views.

Seek out new viewpoints from others. Ask people in a nonthreatening way how their perspectives differ. '...

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Self-Reflection

It's the ability to pay attention to your own thoughts, emotions, decisions, and behaviors.

There are three skills that can be practiced and will lead to better self-reflection:

Openness

It means seeing things for what they are, not what we think they should be.

To cultivate openness, we have to become aware of our misconceptions, default beliefs, biases, expectations and stereotypes about the world and actively try to overcome them. Keeping a Decision Journal is a good way to start.

Observation

It means being able to look at yourself with perspective and distance.

Real-time self-reflection requires us to shift our attention away from what’s happening outside and instead observe what’s happening inside. Mindfulness meditation practice is the best way to cultivate this ability.

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Being Fooled By Data

Data can be used to prove anything.
People can be easily convinced by using data that, when analyzed closely, turns out to be dubious, without foundation o...

Made Up Data

  • Data can be easily made up to serve ulterior motives, which are far from the truth.
  • Biased data finds its way out and is generally passed around as facts.
  • Some critical thinking and skepticism are required before any data is accepted for making decisions.

The Narrative Fallacy

People normally create a narrative based on their past and are sure that their predictions will match the way things will work out in the future. This is not usually the case, and it leads to wrong decisions.

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Decision-making rules

Write a clear, objective set of rules to guide future decisions.

It will enable you to make a decision that is detached from the emotion of the moment.

Don't decide alone

Never make an onerous decision by yourself. Tap into the wisdom of the company's internal crowd.

The 'revolving door' approach

... is a technique that relies on using an outside perspective. 

If you're stuck in a big decision, you have to pretend you're a new CEO or a turnaround manager who can "see things more clearly." Adopting a third-person perspective helps you tap into an objective mode of judgment--one based on facts and an understanding of the consequences.