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How to Think About Your Career

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https://medium.com/the-year-of-the-looking-glass/how-to-think-about-your-career-abf5300eba08

medium.com

How to Think About Your Career
If you had asked 22-year-old me what my "career aspirations" were, I would have looked at you blankly and then casually changed the subject to what programs you'd recommend to model cute 3D bunnies for a video game, or whether the writers of would be so devious as to ship Sydney Bristow and Sark.

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Defining your career

Your career is defined by your skills and how you’ve used them, not by any external measure of your progress.

If you focus exclusively on improving your skills and your impact on your organiz...

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Treat your manager as a coach

A good manager’s job is to help you and the rest of your team get better results. So it would be logical that she should be invested in your career. When you do better, then by extension, she does ...

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See yourself succeeding

There is research that shows if you can create a clear visualization of yourself achieving the outcome you want, you prime yourself to act in a way that is consistent with what you imagine.

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You own your career

... and you have more of an ability to shape it than anybody else.

No matter how many people are on the sidelines helping you, ignoring you, or working against you, your career and your life ...

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Understand Your Performance Evaluation

Find out if your performance evaluation is according to what you understand. Identify your goals and key performance indicators with your manager, and discuss accordingly.

Solve your Blind Spots

Ask for feedback, learn from it and adjust your performance (or behavior) according to the areas of improvement that you get to know from others.

Example: After giving a presentation, talk about what went well and ask if there is something that you could have done better.

Keep a Journal

Keeping a journal with a record of your learnings and feedback (areas of improvement) can keep us on the right path, and speed up our progress, and learning too.

Listing out 5 or 10 areas of improvement and tracking the progress in weekly or monthly reviews is a great way to develop your career.

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Entrepreneurial zeal

A little entrepreneurial zeal can give you a distinct advantage in your professional life, whether or not you think you’d ever strike out on our own.

How to train your corporate mind

  1. Get Passionate. This is the key to career success and fulfillment in any field.
  2. Be Bothered by Inefficiency. Consider whether there are places you could implement solutions (or at least recommend improvements).
  3. Take on More Risk. More risk, more reward.” At work, start small by pitching new ideas or volunteering to take on a challenge or two that’s outside of your comfort zone.
  4. Brainstorm More. Constant innovation is crucial to a business’ long-term success. Schedule some time each week to really brainstorm about something that’s been on your mind. See what you come up with.
  5. Don’t Limit Your Dreams. Many people are conditioned to be realistic and practical. Rather dream big for your career.

Why Interviewers Ask It

This introductory question serves as an icebreaker to lend an easy flow to the conversation. It helps the recruiter to get to know you in terms of hard and soft skills.

It’s a great op...

How to build your response

  • Present: Talk a little bit about what your current role is, the scope of it, and possibly a recent achievement.
  • Past: Tell the interviewer how you got there and/or mention a past experience that’s relevant to the job and company you’re applying for.
  • Future: Continue with what you’re looking to do next and why you’re interested in this job.
You do not have to respond in this order. Tweak it to suit you. Make sure to tie it to the job and company.

Tailor Your Answer

Interviewers want to know how your answer about yourself is relevant to the position and company you’re applying for.

This is an opportunity to articulate why you’re interested and how your objective fulfills their goals. In order to do that, spend some time researching the company. If your answers resonate with them, it shows that you really understand the role.

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