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How to use a day off from work to recharge your energy, focus & motivation

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https://blog.rescuetime.com/day-off-recharge-focus/

blog.rescuetime.com

How to use a day off from work to recharge your energy, focus & motivation
Everyone loves a day off (or two). Unfortunately, few of us actually take advantage of them. In fact, studies show most people only send 40% less email on holiday Mondays compared with regular ones. Despite this, the benefits of taking time off can't be underestimated.

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Do nothing (on purpose)

Too many of us equate doing something with being busy. We don’t need to fill every moment of our lives—both at work and at home—being productive. 

Engaging in doing noth...

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Engage in “Deliberate Rest”

Deliberate Rest means engaging with restful activities that are often vigorous and mentally engaging.

For example, Winston Churchill and Victor Hugo painted while Leo Tolstoy played...

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Catch up on that one thing

Most of us put off tasks that stress us out. Unfortunately, this avoidance kicks off a cycle of procrastination that just causes more stress. ...

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Benefits of taking time off

People who create a proper work-life balance experience less work-related fatigue, lower rates of procrastination, and even better mental and physical health.

Time away from work impro...

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Taking time off

It may seem counterintuitive, but the best way to get the most from a day off and feel rested and restored for coming back to work is to do more with your time, not less.

Binge-watching TV ca...

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Do nothing (on purpose)

Purposeful idleness is no small task. A few tips:

  • Start with small sessions and take the time to build up your endurance.
  • To help you do nothing, keep your devices out of reach (...

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Engage in “Deliberate Rest”

It means engaging with restful activities that are often vigorous and mentally engaging.

Deliberate rest activities help you relax and recharge as they focus on something tangenti...

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Tasks you;re putting off

Committing to crossing one of them off of your to-do list on a day off can improve your overall well-being.

Whether you’ve been putting off answering an email, calling a friend, writin...

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Why we don't take time off

  • We think more work should equal more output: we see productivity not as doing more with less. But simply doing more.
  • We’re afraid of being “left behind”:  not only could we miss out on some important conversation, but we worry that we’ll be left behind.
  • Work has become a larger part of our identity: we feel personally connected to the work we do. Taking time away opens up all sorts of questions that can be hard to face. 

Deliberate rest

It is a play on the term “deliberate practice” and it means engaging with restful activities that are often vigorous and mentally engaging.

It is not a continuation of work, but a way to find activities that let you recharge from your workday, while still being mentally productive.

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Personal Productivity Curves

A lot of the internal things that affect our productivity are out of our control. Our energy, focus, and motivation follow their own path or “productivity curve” throughout the day. 

Energy curves

We’re naturally more energetic and motivated at specific times of the day. Researchers call this our Circadian Rhythm. Every person’s rhythm is slightly different, but the majority follow a similar pattern.

  • Waking up. Our energy levels start to naturally rise.
  • Around 10 am. We’ve hit our peak concentration levels that start to decline and dip between 1-3 pm.
  • Afternoon.  Our energy levels rise again until falling off again sometime between 9–11 pm.

90 Minute Cycles

We work best in natural cycles of 90-120 minute sessions before needing a break. When we need a break, our bodies send us signals, such as becoming hungry, sleepy, fidgeting, or losing focus.

If you ignore these signs and think you can just work through them, your body uses your reserve stores of energy to keep up. It means releasing stress hormones to give an extra kick of energy.

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Breaks keep us from getting bored

The human brain just wasn’t built for the extended focus we ask of it these days.

The fix for this unfocused condition is simple—all we need is a brief interruption (aka a break) to ge...

Breaks and brain connections

Our brains have two modes:

  • focused mode, which we use when we’re doing things like learning something new, writing or working) and 
  • diffuse mode, which is our more relaxed, daydreamy mode when we’re not thinking so hard.

The mind solves its stickiest problems while daydreaming—something you may have experienced while driving or taking a shower.

Breaks help us reevaluate our goals

When you work on a task continuously, it’s easy to lose focus and get lost in the weeds. In contrast, following a brief intermission, picking up where you left off forces you to take a few seconds to think globally about what you’re ultimately trying to achieve. 

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