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https://www.lifegate.com/ice-cream-history

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Ice cream, a short history. All the facts, flavours and who invented them
What was the first ice cream flavour? Who invented the ice cream cone? Let's answer these and other questions by revisiting the facts and history of this irresistible delicacy.

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Ice Cream: From 1945 Until Today

The first ice cream factories opened in the USA before the war. In Italy, pre-confectioned ice cream was a post-war delicacy.

In recent years, home-made or artisan ice-cream has become incr...

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The first Ice Cream Cup

The first Ice Cream Cup

The first ice cream cup was found in Egypt in a tomb in 2700BC.

It was a kind of mould made from two silver cups, one of which contained snow or crushed ice, and the other ...

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Ice Cream: The Early Days

  • Ancient Rome had special wells to store ice and snow. The ruins of Pompeii left traces to make us think that some shops specialised in selling crushed ice sweetened with honey.
  • In ...

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Ice Cream Legends

  • One legend claims that the Medici family organised a competition for the most original culinary recipes. It was won by a chicken seller (a Ruggeri) who submitted a compositi...

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In Cream: The 1600s

  • 1674: The French author Nicolas Lemery cites the first recipe in French for aromatised ice.
  • 1685 - 1686: Scientist and poet Francesco Redi wrote i...

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Ice Cream: The 1700s

  • 1769 - 1770: By the late 1700s, wafers rolled into a cone shape were served at the end of the meal or along with fruit and pastries.
  • 1770: Giovann...

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Ice Cream: The 1800s

  • 1843: Nancy M. Johnson creates and patents an "artificial freezer" to make iced products. Two years later, William Young added a motor.
  • 1851

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Ice Cream In The 1900s

  • 1896: Italo Marchioni begins to serve and sell cone-shaped wafer cups in New York. He patents his method of making them in 1903.
  • 1902: In Great Br...

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Oreos: The best-selling cookies in the world

Oreos: The best-selling cookies in the world

Oreos have been around since 1912. They are the best-selling cookies in the world and sold in over 100 countries.

When they were introduced in 1912, they were known as Oreo...

Oreo was not an original concept

Food scientist Sam J. Porcello invented the newer version of the Oreo. He was one of the world's foremost experts on cocoa and helped develop the extra indulgent chocolate and white chocolate-covered Oreo.

The original recipe for Oreo cookies contained lard (pork fat). With the changing climate of the low-fat 1990s, the lard was replaced, and the cookie became kosher and unexpectedly also vegan.

Unusual Oreos

  • In 1984, The Oreo Big Stuf was launched. Individually wrapped, the snack was a massive 316 calories (a single Oreo contains about 53 calories) and took around 20 minutes to eat.
  • Oreo cookies are also used in pie crusts, churros, and ice cream cones.
  • In January 2017, Virginia-based The Veil Brewing Company released a version of their chocolate milk stout infused with real Oreo cookies. It was sold out within a week.
  • Game of Thrones Oreo: One winter, a special edition Oreos came out embossed with the crests of the four remaining (at the time) houses. The cookie company went to the production company that made the main titles for GoT Elastic. The Oreo-meets-GoT universe took about 2,750 computer-generated Oreos with 20 million crumbs scattered throughout the Oreo-scape.

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The secret to self-discipline

The elegant secret to discipline: valuing your future self as highly as you value your current self, at least long enough to get your Right Now Self to do the right thing.

The choices of your Past Selves

You are currently experiencing the future of all your Past Selves. Their choices have come to fruition.

If you would like better fruits, make your Right Now Self into someone who, as a habit, rolls out the red carpet for Future Self.

Catch yourself cheating

Recognize the moments when you’re about to sell out your Future Self: They often happen when you are in retail establishments and involve televisions or other gratifying electronic devices, high-fructose corn syrup and disposable packaging.

Your body doesn't need outside help to detox

Your body doesn't need outside help to detox

Your body is capable of handling toxin removal all on its own. 

While it's true that things like a regular habit of drinking too much can eve...

Detoxing is not an easy fix

After end-of-year binges on unhealthy and often processed foods, the post-New Year's detox can feel right. People love a quick fix.  The issue is that they're just not sustainable.

True health is about making long-lasting changes that you can stick to, and that's the opposite of what a detox really is.

Slashing certain macronutrients

Carbs, protein, and fat are the trifecta of perfection for keeping your body healthy. 

  • Carbs offer both physical and mental fuel, 
  • protein helps keep you full and is the building block of muscle, 
  • fat is satiating and prettifying (it often has skin-improving antioxidants). 
When you eliminate these important nutrients, you may see slowed metabolism from drastically decreasing calories, dry skin, decreased energy, and crankiness.

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Benefits of workplace collaboration

Employees can share resources, swap perspectives, and boost each other’s creativity.

Collaboration allows us to capitalize on the collective knowledge and expertise of our people, whil...

Downsides of collaboration

Collaborations can be unproductive, time-wasting, and a strain on top employees.

Collaborative organizational structure can drain people’s time and resources, wherein employees are “emailed to death and meetinged to death."

For effective collaboration...

... (or delegation), it helps to know where everyone’s expertise lies. 

Make sure your employees get to know each other, whether that happens through group lunches, coffee breaks, or informal social events. This also builds trust — a vital element for successful collaboration.

The scientific revolution

Human history is often framed as a series of episodes, representing sudden bursts of knowledge. The Agricultural Revolution, the Renaissance, and the Industrial Revolution are a few examples where ...

Pseudo-Science 

Much of the knowledge about the natural world during the middle ages dates back to the teachings of the Greeks and Romans. Many did not question these ideas, despite the many flaws.

  • Aristotle taught everything beneath the moon was comprised of four elements: earth, air, water, and fire.
  • Greek astronomer Claudius Ptolemy thought that heavenly bodies such as the sun, moon, planets and various stars all revolved around the earth in perfect circles.
  • The ancient Greeks and Romans held to the idea that illnesses were the result of an imbalance of four basic substances and was related to the theory of the four elements.

Rebirth and Reformation

  • During the Renaissance, there was a renewed interest in the arts and literature. It led to a shift toward more independent thinking.
  • In 1517, Martin Luther nailed his 95 theses to the door of the Roman Catholic Church. Luther promoted his thoughts by printing and distributing them, encouraging churchgoers to read the Bible for themselves. This led to the Protestant Reformation.
  • In the process, the criticism and reform led to placing the burden of proof ahead in understanding the natural world, paving the way for the scientific revolution.

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Stay Hydrated

Do:

  • Keep in mind that the usual recommendation is eight glasses per day of fluid.
  • Set regular reminders to ensure we are hydrating our bodies.
  • You ...

GO Foods

GO foods give us the energy to be active, work, and fight diseases.
From this category: rice, pasta, bread, and root crops. They release energy more slowly, fuelling you for longer and helping to maintain your weight.

GROW Foods

Grow foods help our body with physical growth and help the body rebuild after diseases and infections.
From this category: meat, fish, eggs, milk and other dairy products such as cheese and yogurt. They are often required in small amounts but are essential to be consumed daily.

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The Uberman Sleep Schedule

  • According to the Uberman research, Sleep follows the 80/20 Rule—that is, 80% of your recovery comes from 20% of the time you’re asleep.
  • The Uberman Sleep Schedule:  if you to...

About willpower

  • Most people think of self-discipline in terms of willpower only, which is wrong.
  • Individuals who are able to follow the set rules of self-discipline also tend to be the ones who enjoy the routine.
  • To succeed in your self-discipline routine, your willpower must be trained steadily over a long period of time.

Natural instincts

  • Disciplining people through shame and guilt works well in society, and natural impulses/ instincts being suppressed by religion and philosophers.
  • The curbing of our natural instincts is a method employed to protect us from our over-indulgence and from our own natural desires.

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The Paleo Diet

The Paleo Diet

The basic concept of the paleo diet is to eat whole foods and avoid processed foods.

Studies suggest that this diet can lead to significant weight loss and major improveme...

A general guideline

There is no one "right" way to eat for everyone.

Some eat a low-carb diet high in animal foods, while others follow a high-carb diet with lots of plants.

Avoid these foods and ingredients:

  • Sugar and high-fructose corn syrup.
  • All Grains.
  • Legumes like beans and lentils.
  • Most Dairy, especially low-fat dairy.
  • Some vegetable oils like soybean, sunflower, cottonseed, corn, grapeseed, safflower and other oils.
  • Trans fats: "hydrogenated" or "partially hydrogenated" oils found in margarine and various processed foods.
  • Artificial sweeteners: Aspartame, sucralose, cyclamates, saccharin, acesulfame potassium. 
  • Highly processed foods: Everything labeled "diet" or "low-fat" or that has many additives.

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Understanding how long food lasts

Understanding how long food lasts

Should humanity face a nuclear apocalypse of worldwide war, we need to understand which foods might be safe for survivors to eat, and how long the foods will last.

To understand this, we ne...

Why foods go bad

Most foods spoil because of the growth of microbes. Preserving food is an attempt to limit microbial growth. Food can be preserved by drying, salting, chilling, or storing in air-tight containers.

  • Drying is the most effective because microbial growth is inhibited.
  • Salting is effective because it removes moisture, creating an environment where microbes cannot survive.
  • Sugar coating can prevent bacterial cells from functioning correctly.
  • Storing in air-tight containers is less effective because there are probably a lot of microbes on the food before you put it in the container. Some microbes are anaerobic, meaning they don't need oxygen.

Food preservatives

Preservatives are used in foods to extend their shelf lives. One of McDonald's Big Mac in Iceland is an example of a long-lasting processed food. It has been on display since 2009, in a glass box. Preservatives that has been discontinued by McDonald's are:

  • calcium propionate that prevents mold growth on bread.
  • sorbic acid that also inhibits mold from cheese
  • sodium benzoate, which inhibits the growth of bacteria in the Big Mac special sauce.

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The world's favorite fast food

The world's favorite fast food

Pizza is the world's favorite fast food, with some three billion pizza sold every year in the US alone.

The story of how pizza became so popular reveals much about the history ...

History of Pizza

Pizza - pieces of flatbread, topped with savories - was a simple and tasty meal for those who could not afford plates.

  • Early pizzas appear in Virgil's Aeneid. Aeneas and his crew ate thin wheaten cakes with mushrooms and herbs scattered on them.
  • In the 18th century Naples, pizza as we know it came into being. With a struggling urban economy and a great number of poor inhabitants, they needed food that was cheap and easy to eat. Pizza met this need.

Pizzas were scorned

For a long time, pizzas were associated with poverty and scorned by food writers.

In 1831, Samuel Morse described pizza as a ‘species of the most nauseating cake … covered over with slices of pomodoro or tomatoes, and sprinkled with little fish and black pepper and I know not what other ingredients, it altogether looks like a piece of bread that has been taken reeking out of the sewer.

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