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KonMari Method Checklist: 5-Step Cheat Sheet (w/ Visual) | Sloww
This is probably one of the shortest-but most useful-posts you'll find on the KonMari Method. It's taken straight from the source, and you can also read a summary of Marie Kondo's book here: This post is meant to be a quick reference guide or cheat sheet that you can bookmark and come back to without having to get lost in the details in other posts.

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5-Step Decluttering Cheat Sheet

  1. Discarding by category comes first (clothes first, then books, papers etc.)
  2. Break a category into subcategories (e.g. Tops: shirts, sweaters etc.)
  3. Keep on...

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing

It explores how putting your space in order causes correspondingly dramatic changes in lifestyle and perspective.

Marie Kondo, the author, recommends that you start by discarding an...

The problem with storage

Putting things away creates the illusion that the clutter problem has been solved.

Organizing all your junk better does not equal getting rid of clutter. And unfortunately most people leap at storage methods that promise quick and convenient ways to remove visible clutter.

Tidy by category, not by location

For example, set goals like “clothes today, books tomorrow.” 

We often store the same type of item in more than one place and when we tidy each place separately, we fail to see that we’re repeating the same work in many locations. 

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Declutter Your World

Declutter Your World

Takumi Kawahara and Marie Kondo, a couple from Japan, are co-founders of KonMari Media. They have a bestseller (authored by Kondo) about decluttering and cleaning your world, and also a highly popu...

Tidying Up with Marie Kondo

The Netflix Show ‘Tidying Up with Marie Kondo’ is the most-watched non-fiction show on the platform. She is now at par with Martha Stewart, Oprah, and Gwyneth Paltrow, as a goddess of wellness and domesticity.

She has an e-commerce website, blog, newsletter, and does consultation work in over 40 countries through her personally created brand. 

The Criticism

Marie Kondo’s decluttering philosophy, which became a rage, invited critics to label her as someone who has an anti-capitalist agenda that can cripple the economy. 

She was also labeled as someone who only appeals to the rich. This unwanted attention resulted in even more business opportunities.

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KonMari is not full-proof

If you're single, or a couple with a small pet in a tiny apartment it may work. But if you're a large family in a larger space you'll have to pick and choose what works otherwise outsource some ...

Pros of the KonMari Method

  1. Decluttering in one shot allows for immediate transformation: If you tidy a little at a time, you would tidy forever because you wouldn't see the drastic results.
  2. Sorting by category instead of by room can save you time.
  3. The emphasis is keeping only what "sparks joy": Will help you better decide what to keep, and also give you a greater appreciation for what you have.
  4. You let go of your stuff with gratitude for the usefulness they served

Cons of the KonMari Method

  1. This process may not be realistic for larger spaces or families: This guide is written from the point of view of a single woman in her early 30's who lives in a small flat in Japan.
  2. Category sorting may not be as effective if you have a family.
  3. Untagging clothes and immediately hanging them in your closet doesn't always make sense.
  4. The book doesn't address how to deal with children's toys.

The junk drawer

The junk drawer

The "junk drawer" has become a universally acknowledged space where you store all the things that doesn't seem to have a place. It is not always a drawer - it could be a room,...

Discard before organizing

Don't think how you will organise items if you're still considering what to keep. You can only assess available storage space when you're done decluttering.

Sort and throw away first before you put back the stuff you've been collecting in your junk drawer.

Tidy by category, not location

Gather all the items of one category in one spot. You can only decide what to keep and what to discard if you know what you have and how much you have.

Categorization is important in the process of decluttering. The five main categories are clothes, books, paper, miscellaneous, mementos. Gather and assess all like items at the same time. If you have two junk drawers, tackle the objects in both spaces at the same time.

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Working from a comfortable home

Working from a comfortable home

While working from home during the current pandemic, you might want to consider tips that could make your life easier.

For instance, making sure that you feel joyful and productive at ...

Separating private from professional life

While working remotely, it might turn up to be quite challenging to separate private from professional life. This is why you should try to find a ritual that has the role to set the boundaries between the two.

Furthermore, you could also place the things you use while working in a separate place from your personal belongings.

Home office in a shared home

Working remotely is likely to become permanent in many companies, given the uncertainty of the current situation.

While doing home office can be quite a piece of cake when you live alone, it might become a challenge if you live with somebody else. The most important is that both you and your partner know exactly how to support and help each other in order for things to function properly.

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Benefits of Decluttering

  • More time and energy for the people and activities you love
  • A more spacious, peaceful, calmer and clutter-free home
  • Financial freedom by choosing to own and bu...

Quick Tips to Declutter More Effectively

  1. Keep an ongoing donation box easily accessible:.
  2. Instead of keeping things you don’t use or love, get rid of them as soon as you find them.
  3. Try decluttering as quickly and efficiently as you can for just 10 minutes a day.
  4. Schedule regular times to declutter and stick to them.
  5. Use the “one in, one out” rule: Whenever you buy or bring something new into your home, find one thing to get rid of in its place.
  6. Make sure you have a place to keep everything you’re choosing to keep.
  7. Get things out of your house as soon as possible.
  8. Track results. Take before and after pictures.
  9. Don’t organize until after you declutter.
  10. Use a “maybe box” for items you’re struggling to let go of.
  11. Use the 20/20 rule for items you’re keeping “just in case”: It eans if you can replace the item for less than $20 and in less than 20 minutes, don’t keep it “just in case”.

The new buzzword

The "pursuit of joy" seems to be the new buzzword to counter the fear of missing out phenomenon.

What brings you joy? Joy is pared with cleaning up our cluttered lives: from household clu...

Life clutter builds up

We are constantly invited to do something, think something, experience something or buy something.

For every social event or task we say yes to, we run the risk of overfilling our lives. It may leave us feeling overstretched, overtired and overwhelmed.

Inability to say "no"

There is often an underlying fear that prevents us from saying no. Perhaps we fear that we are not good enough. We find the compulsive "yes" might help us feel better. However, we cannot continue living at this pace.

We need to ask ourselves why we continue to do the very things that make us unhappy. Self-restraint and missing out are vital for our well-being.

Minimalism

It's the idea that by owning less, we free up the time, energy, and money to get the most out of life. The more intentional we are about what we keep, the freer we are to seek fulfillment.

Reasons For A Minimalist Closet

  • Tidier closet: you won’t have to dig through items you don’t wear
  • Increased confidence: if all your clothes are your best, you feel good no matter what you put on
  • More time and money: being satisfied with your wardrobe means shopping less so you can use your time and cash on more important things
  • Positive environmental impact: by investing in long-wear clothing, instead of fast fashion, you help prevent waste.

Minimalist Vs Capsule Wardrobe

Capsule wardrobes are a subsection of minimalist wardrobes that limit how many items of clothing you buy each season. Most capsule wardrobes have 30 items or less.

Minimalist wardrobes are more flexible. There is no set number of items as long as you wear all of them – and they bring you joy. 

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“The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak.”

Hans Hofmann

Remove decorations

... that no longer inspire you. Just because something made you happy in the past doesn’t mean you have to keep it forever.

Your life has moved on—maybe it’s time for the decoration to do the same. Keeping just the items that mean the most to you will help them to shine.

Reject the convenience fallacy

There are certain places in our homes we tend to leave items out for convenience. By leaving these things out, we think we’re saving time and simplifying our lives. That’s the convenience fallacy. 

W might save a couple of seconds, but the other 99.9 percent of the time, those items just sit there creating a visual distraction. 

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The new minimalism

In part, the new minimalism is a kind of cultural aftershock of the 2008 housing crisis and banking collapse. At the same time, minimalism has become an increasingly aspirational and deluxe way ...

Minimalism for the affluent

Many people have minimalism forced upon them by circumstance. Poverty and trauma can make frivolous possessions seem like a lifeline instead of a burden.

Although many of today's gurus insist that minimalism is useful regardless of income, they target the affluent. The focus on self-improvement is more about accumulation.

Minimalism of ideas

True minimalism is not about throwing things out, but about challenging your beliefs in an attempt to engage with ideas as they are, to not shy away from reality or its lack of answers. 

Underneath the vision of “less” is a mode of living that heightens the miracle of human presence.

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