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Millennials abandon hope for religion but revere human rights

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https://theconversation.com/millennials-abandon-hope-for-religion-but-revere-human-rights-90537

theconversation.com

Millennials abandon hope for religion but revere human rights
Canada is increasingly moving towards a secular culture. "Spiritual but not religious" has become our new norm -- bringing with it ideas of mutual respect and protection for marginalized identities.

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Spiritual But Not Religious (SBNR)

Spiritual But Not Religious (SBNR)

In Canada, millennials are ditching orthodox religions and embracing spirituality. There is a distinct movement towards spirituality, and it is led by the young crowd.

SBNRs don’t look ...

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Self Spirituality

... has its roots in the 1960s counterculture and the ‘Rights Revolution, and focuses on individual rights, where there is no one size fits all rules.

They feel complete within the...

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Religious Authorities

... predictably denounce self-spirituality, and provide their reasons. They say this leads to narcissism, hedonism, or both, but in reality, they are terrified that people are allowed to choose not...

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A Human Religion

Humanity is sacralized in Self-spirituality, which automatically makes it an obvious choice for the millennials and youngsters already fed up with how the world works.

This also makes them...

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

"Being spiritual" nowadays signals:

"Being spiritual" nowadays signals:
  1. People that believe there is more to the world than meets the eye, more than the mere material. 
  2. People that attend to their inner life (their mental and emotio...

Understanding the world

Spirituality is a framework for understanding the world. It enables people to make sense of that which, for them, science and religion fail to address: religion because it's outdated and out of touch with scientific progress, science because it's incapable to answer some of life's most crucial questions (of purpose, meaning and value).

Outer Space vs. Inner Space

The Dalai Lama once joked: "While the West was busy exploring outer space, the East was busy exploring inner space". 

Regardless of the veracity of this, it does seem that for contemporary western societies, silence and stillness are an exception, not the rule.

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The Universal God

Aldous Huxley's The Perennial Philosophy(1945) is an extraordinary work of synthesis, introducing global (particularly eastern) spirituality into mainstream western culture.

The Phi...

Fresh Take On Religion

  • Modern society has been described as the Age of Noise, and an Organized Lovelessness.
  • Advertising is revealed to be an organized effort to extend and intensify craving.
  • People in the modern age worship progress, technology, and their nation-state, all of which can be described as a 'religion'.
  • The dogma of such religions was profoundly criticized in the classic books, while paving the way towards newer ways to find God, like meditation.

The Author and Philosopher's fresh take on religion, shaping it as an 'empirical spirituality' was a huge influence in the 1960s and which has since then led to more people (now 27% in the US) being 'Spiritual but not Religious'

Constructing One's Reality

Aldous Huxley was heavily criticized after his death by newer philosophers who didn't subscribe to the Perennial Philosophy.

While the author insisted that the ultimate mystical experience is the moment of pure oneness with God where the concepts of 'I', language, image and culture are dissolved, his critics argued that all religions are true and some of them are truer than the others.

One of the critics states that human beings construct reality using their bodies, rituals, words, actions and cultures.

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Describing wonder

Wonder is said to be a childish emotion. However, as adults, we experience it when gaping at something unexpectedly spectacular.

Adam Smith, an 18th-century moral philosopher, describes wond...

Bodily symptoms

The bodily symptoms of this strange appearance point to three dimensions:

  • Sensory: The marvelous things take hold of our senses - we stare and widen our eyes.
  • Cognitive: We are perplexed because we don't have a past experience to understand them. It leads to a suspension of breath, similar to when we are startled.
  • Spiritual: We look upwards in veneration, which makes our heart swell.

The scale of wonder

At the mild end of this emotion, we talk about things being marvelous. More intense emotions might be described as astonishing. The extreme of this experiences is met with expressions of awe.

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