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New Study Shows Brief Meditation Can Reduce Anger

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https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/urban-survival/201602/new-study-shows-brief-meditation-can-reduce-anger

psychologytoday.com

New Study Shows Brief Meditation Can Reduce Anger
A new study in the journal Consciousness and Cognition suggests that one session of meditation can help reduce your body's response to anger. Occasional anger can be normal, and even healthy, but constant and frequent anger takes a toll on your body and mind.

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Simple 20 Minutes Meditation

Simple 20 Minutes Meditation
  • Sit comfortably.
  • Close your eyes or stare at the ground a few feet away from you.
  • Rest your hands on your thighs.
  • Focus your attention on the area a few fingers below y...

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The Benefits Of Meditation

Repeated, consistent practice of meditation enhances our ability to cope and sit with negative emotions like anger without reacting.

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The Physical Benefits Of Meditation

Studies suggest that, regardless of the practitioner’s experience, meditation can help reduce the body's response to anger, reducing the toll frequent anger takes on you.

Anger and fru...

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Becoming Virtually Invulnerable To Anger

In people with dozens of hours of meditation experience, thinking about an angry experience showed no physical reaction. Their heart rate, blood pressure, and breathing rat...

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