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No diet, no detox: how to relearn the art of eating | Bee Wilson

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https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/jan/05/diet-detox-art-healthy-eating

theguardian.com

No diet, no detox: how to relearn the art of eating | Bee Wilson
The long read: Our relationship with food has become disordered and obsessive. As the new year brings diet madness, it needn't be such a struggle to learn good eating habits

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The art of eating

The art of eating

... is a question of psychology as much as nutrition. We have to find a way to want to eat what’s good for us.

We make frequent attempts – more or less half-hearted – to change what we...

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Food preferences are learned

All the foods that you regularly eat are ones that you learned to eat.  Everyone starts life drinking milk. After that, it’s all up for grabs. 

But in today’s food cultu...

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0.3% of young women are anorexic

... and another 1% are bulimic, with rising numbers of men joining them.

What statistics are not particularly effective at telling us is how many others – whether overweight or ...

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Healthy vs. New

Consumer scientists have found that when a new product is described as “healthy”, it is far less likely to be a success than if it is described as “new”.

Many people have absorbed the lesson ...

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Once we accept that eating is a learned behaviour, we see that the challenge is not to grasp information but to learn new habits.

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Viewed through behavioural psychology

... eating is a classic form of learned behaviour:

  • There is a stimulus – an apple tart, for example, glazed with apricot jam.
  • there is a response – your appe...

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Food and dopamine

Food-seeking learning is driven by dopamine, a neurotransmitter connected with motivation.

This is a hormone that is stimulated in the brain when your body does something rewarding, such as ...

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Changing food habits

Changing food habits

There are 3 big things we would all benefit from learning to do: 

  • to follow structured mealtimes
  • to respond to our own internal cues for hunger and f...

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For our diets to change...

... as well as educating ourselves about nutrition, we need to relearn the food experiences that first shaped us. The change doesn’t happen through rational argument.

It is a form of r...

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Mastering mindful mealtimes

  • Cook or prepare food yourself if possible.
  • Don’t scroll through social media when eating.
  • Turn off all streaming services.

Intuitive eating

  • It does not approve the diet culture.
  • It respects all body shapes and sizes.
  • It helps you recognize your body’s cues for hunger and fullness.
  • It helps you evaluate habits you want to change, but without policing food.
  • It helps you liberate from food’s control.
  • It makes you see food as fuel rather than filler.

Paleo concept

Humans evolved on a diet very different from today's eating habits. To be healthier, leaner, stronger and fitter, we must re-think our diet and remove some of the food groups we ...

What to eat

  • Animals (especially a "whole animal" approach, including organs, bone marrow, cartilage, and organs).
  • Animal products (such as eggs or honey).
  • Vegetables and fruits.
  • Raw nuts and seeds.
  • Added fats (like coconut oil, avocado, butter, ghee).

What to avoid

  • Grains, although research suggests eating whole grains improve our health and appear to be neutral when it comes to inflammation.
  • Heavily processed oils, such as canola and soybean oil.
  • Legumes, although research suggests the benefits of legumes outweigh their anti-nutrient content. Cooking eliminates most anti-nutrient effects. Some anti-nutrients may even be good.
  • Dairy.

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The Mediterranean diet

The Mediterranean diet
The heart-healthy Mediterranean diet is a healthy eating plan based on typical foods and recipes of Mediterranean-style cooking.

The diet includes fruits, vegetables, fish and whole grains, p...

Benefits of the Traditional Mediterranean diet

Research has shown that the traditional Mediterranean diet 

  • reduces the risk of heart disease
  • is associated with a lower level of the "bad" cholesterol
  • is associated with a reduced incidence of cancer, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. 

Key components of the Mediterranean diet

  • Eating of primarily plant-based foods, such as fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts
  • Replacing butter with healthy fats such as olive oil and canola oil
  • Using herbs and spices instead of salt to flavor foods
  • Limiting red meat to no more than a few times a month
  • Eating fish and poultry at least twice a week
  • Enjoying meals with family and friends
  • Drinking red wine in moderation (optional)
  • Getting plenty of exercise.