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Pop Culture’s Rate of Change May Mirror Organic Evolution

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https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/pop-cultures-rate-of-change-may-mirror-organic-evolution/

scientificamerican.com

Pop Culture’s Rate of Change May Mirror Organic Evolution
Nothing captures the depth and dimensions of a generation gap like popular music. Parents, mystified (or horrified) by their children's taste-"How can they listen to that stuff?"-harken back to their own youth, when the Rolling Stones or the Bee Gees or Prince ruled the charts.

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Changing Tunes

Changing Tunes

Today’s music sounds vastly different from that of the previous generations to most people, making the phenomenon of rapid cultural change a common perception, which may not be true.

The ‘G...

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Rapid or Slow Evolution

A study which compares the rates of evolution of certain cultural aspects like automobiles, pop music, and literature, show that the evolutionary pace of modern culture is slower and more consta...

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