deepstash

Beta

Putting sleep myths to bed: experts answer the questions that keep you awake at night

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2016/jan/31/putting-sleep-myths-to-bed-experts-on-insomnia

theguardian.com

Putting sleep myths to bed: experts answer the questions that keep you awake at night
Dr Guy Meadows is a specialist in chronic insomnia and clinical director of The Sleep School, London Dr Guy Meadows is a specialist in chronic insomnia and clinical director of The Sleep School, London Derk-Jan Dijk is professor of sleep and physiology at Surrey's Sleep Research Centre Gillian Twigg is principal clinical scientist at the sleep centre at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust Dr Guy Leschziner is a consultant neurologist at the sleep disorder centre, Guy's and St Thomas' hospitals, London Guy Meadows A lot of the symptoms associated with a hangover are a product of sleep deprivation.

10

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

How alcohol affects sleep

A lot of the symptoms associated with a hangover are a product of sleep deprivation.

Alcohol affects our ability to get into what is known as rapid eye movement (REM...

188 SAVES


Eating before bed

It is important to leave at least a couple of hours between eating and sleeping. 

There is a whole raft of so-called sleepy foods – anything containing tryptoph...

216 SAVES


A cure for sleepwalking

There isn’t a cure. 

People who sleepwalk usually are advised to keep their room safe by locking windows and doors, and to maintain what’s called good sleep hygiene: keep to a reg...

94 SAVES


The Possibility of Sleeping too much

  • There is some evidence that suggests that if you sleep excessively, your risk of mortality increases, but it remains controversial.
  • Teenagers naturally have a delay in their sleep pha...

183 SAVES


The cures for insomnia

Acceptance is important.

If you don’t fall asleep within 20 minutes of going to bed, get up, go to another room and do a calming activity, then go back to bed. If you are lying in bed ...

328 SAVES


Napping

325 SAVES


Sleeping pills

Sleeping pills depress the central nervous system, so they feed into biochemical changes that occur in the brain, causing you to drop off to sleep. 

Unlike the...

142 SAVES


Sleep paralysis

We are paralyzed during REM sleep, and we believe that this is so we don’t act out our dreams. 

A small percentage of the population wake up in REM sleep, but t...

153 SAVES


Why People fall asleep on the sofa

... while watching TV, but then can’t sleep when they go to bed.

During a nap, you dissipate some of your sleep pressure. The brain can only produce so much sleep over 24 ho...

141 SAVES


Using the snooze function

The optimal way to wake up is naturally. If someone is hitting the snooze button, it suggests they are not getting enough sleep or they are sleeping at the wrong time for them. If you are a habitua...

201 SAVES


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Keep in sync with your body’s natural sleep-wake cycle

  • Try to go to sleep and get up at the same time every day;
  • Avoid sleeping in, even on weekends;
  • Limit naps to 15 to 20 minutes in the early afternoon;

Melatonin

Is a naturally occurring hormone controlled by light exposure that helps regulate your sleep-wake cycle. 

Your brain secretes more melatonin when it’s dark, making you sleepy, and less when it’s light, making you more alert. 

However, many aspects of modern life can alter your body’s production of melatonin and shift your circadian rhythm

Influence exposure to ligh

During the day:

  • Expose yourself to bright sunlight in the morning. 
  • Spend more time outside during daylight. 
  • Let as much natural light into your home or workspace as possible.

At night:

  • Avoid bright screens within 1-2 hours of your bedtime.
  • Say no to late-night television.
  • Don’t read with backlit devices. 
  • When it’s time to sleep, make sure the room is dark.
  • Keep the lights down if you get up during the night.

6 more ideas

Sleep deprivation

Sleep deprivation

Willpower, memory, judgement, and attention all suffer when you are sleep deprived.

You drop things, crave junk food sugar, overeat, gain weight. You’re more irritable, negative, emotio...

Get through sleep deprivation:

  • Stabilize your blood sugar, by eating hearty food (protein and fat) more often.
  • Reduce refined carbs and increase fats and proteins.
  • B-complex vitamin supplements can give you an immediate boost in alertness and mental clarity.
  • Soak in an Epsom salt bath - might even help you get enough energy to exercise the next day.
  • Drink more water than you usually do to help compensate.
  • Exercise is the single best way to “take out the trash” in your body, and after staying up more hours than you should.

Snoring isn’t harmful

Although snoring may be harmless for most people, it can be a symptom of a life-threatening sleep disorder called sleep apnea, especially if it is accompanied by severe daytime sleepiness. 

You can "cheat" on sleep

Sleep experts say most adults need between seven and nine hours of sleep each night for optimum performance, health, and safety. 

The resulting sleep deprivation has been linked to health problems such as obesity and high blood pressure, negative mood and behavior, decreased productivity, and safety issues in the home, on the job, and on the road.

Turning up the radio

... opening the window, or turning on the air conditioner are effective ways to stay awake when driving.

These "aids" are ineffective and can be dangerous to the person who is driving while feeling drowsy or sleepy. 

It's best to pull off the road in a safe rest area and take a nap for 15-45 minutes. Caffeinated beverages can help overcome drowsiness for a short period of time. 

7 more ideas