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The Case For Crying Your Feelings Out During A Movie

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https://www.refinery29.com/en-us/crying-during-movies-emotional-catharsis

refinery29.com

The Case For Crying Your Feelings Out During A Movie
Crying is an emotional release — and movies can help you get there.

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"Movies can touch feelings in us that we don't normally have access to."

Lena Aburdene Derhally

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The benefits of crying

The benefits of crying

From a psychotherapy point of view, releasing of emotions is a very good thing, especially when we have allowed emotions to build up inside for too long.

Crying doesn't just feel like a...

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Crying during a movie

During a movie, crying is particularly helpful because you're connecting to some emotion on the screen without actually going through it in real life.

For example, if there is a dea...

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Emotional crying

Charles Darwin once declared emotional tears "purposeless."

Humans are the only creatures whose tears are not only a result of pain or irritation but can be triggered by their feelings. Emo...

A range of feelings

Crying is more than a symptom of sadness. It can also be triggered by empathy, surprise, anger, or grief.

Competing theories

  • Some ludicrous theories are that humans evolved from aquatic apes and tears helped humans to live in saltwater.
  • Others persist that crying removes toxic substances from the blood that builds up during times of stress.
  • More plausible theories are that tears trigger social bonding and human connection.
  • Crying signals that there's some important problem that is at least temporarily beyond your ability to cope.
  • Tears show others that we're vulnerable, which is critical to human connection.
  • Crying is also used in manipulating others.

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Flying Changes our Mind and Body

Flying Changes our Mind and Body

Taking a flight creates physical and emotional changes in us, something that is now being more extensively researched. Air travel can change our mood, make us emotionally weak (more cryi...

Flight Effects on Passengers

While we are on a flight, there are plenty of changes that we can experience:

  • Change in brain chemistry and memory due to the deficiency in oxygen.
  • Cognitive deficits in people who are already ill.
  • Increased tiredness and more yawning during the flight.
  • Deterioration in vision, dryness of skin, change in taste of food due to a reduction in the sensitivity of our taste buds and a decrease in the sense of smell.
  • Change in air-pressure makes passengers generally uncomfortable with the sitting.

    The Anxious Flight Passenger

    Mood swings, along with general anxiety or nervousness are common among flight passengers.

    • Less oxygen can increase the effects of alcohol and the overall anxiety. These factors contribute to emotional changes, which can make people less friendly, more stressed out and lethargic.
    • People are also prone to severe mood swings, like having extreme emotional reactions to movie scenes which would otherwise appear normal to them.

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    Matthew Luhn

    “When you share a personal, professional moment where you’ve changed in a positive way, you inspire people. That's..."

    Matthew Luhn

    Closing A Hiring Pitch

    Bring the hiring pitch home with personal stories that show how people authentically live out your company’s mission. Pixar’s films often start from a real, personal story.

    Your company’s big-picture mission might be inspiring, but it’s not necessarily personal. You can make it more personal by peppering your pitches with personal anecdotes about ways that you’ve changed.

    Feeding Interest With The Promise Of Change

    After you’ve hooked your audience/candidate, you need to catch their attention and get the story moving by animating it with change and transformation. In Pixar’s movies, that change isn’t just about reversals of fortune—they’re about personal transformation.

    Great stories promise to change the life of the protagonist who we imagine ourselves to be, if not our own. In light of that, recruiters should focus on how candidates’ lives will change—not just their day-to-day tasks, but also how the new role will change the way they feel. 

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