The Five Step Approach for Tackling Complex Problems - Deepstash

deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

deepstash

Beta

The Five Step Approach for Tackling Complex Problems

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

https://hackernoon.com/five-tactics-to-tackle-complex-problems-at-work-n218y4swm

hackernoon.com

The Five Step Approach for Tackling Complex Problems
In today's world the most valuable employees are the ones who can tackle complex problems. And the best of those are the ones who can make the complex problems look simple. But how can someone actually do that? Below are some tactics I've used which can make a big difference.

6

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Albert Einstein
“The definition of genius is taking the complex and making it simple.”

Albert Einstein

462 SAVES


Ask Questions

The right questions are at the heart of discovery. And one of the very first questions you should be asking yourself is “What assumptions can I challenge?”

The mere act of ...

350 SAVES


Discover the Core Problem

Go beyond the basic features being asked for and get to the heart of the problem.

Ask questions like: Who cares about this problem? Why is it important to them?

If there ar...

323 SAVES


Divide and Conquer

After you come up with a solution to your problem, take a close look at it.

Which pieces could be split into separate modules or components? Can any of those components provide value indep...

291 SAVES


Find your MVP

Think about what would make a good MVP (Minimum Viable Product) for your problem.

Get creative in what you consider an MVP. Maybe showing random strangers at Starbucks a napkin drawing of ...

258 SAVES


Let your Subconscious Work

After spending time researching your problem,  you’ll probably find yourself also thinking about it in your spare time. 

This is when all the different pieces you...

295 SAVES


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Use the why lens

Great leaders only solve problems within their control. Ones connected to their biggest why. They ask:

  • Is this our problem?
  • Why should we solve this problem?
  • What ...

Problems as opportunities

Problems fuel great leaders, providing opportunities to learn and grow to the next level. 

The greater the problem, the hungrier they are for a solution. Leaders like Richard Branson, Elon Musk, and Bill Gates view problems as golden opportunities to disrupt the market and revolutionize the customer experience.

Acknowledging the problem

Great leaders acknowledge there is a problem and demonstrate the severity of the problem and the benefit of the solution to stakeholders, partners, and shareholders. 

This way, the leader not only takes responsibility for making the problem transparent, but he or she also explores different dimensions of the problem, consequently benefiting from others’ ideas.

2 more ideas

Beau Lotto

"There is no inherent value in any piece of data because all information is meaningless in itself. Why? Because in..."

Beau Lotto

Data is Not Reality

  • We see organizations and the engineers who work in them steering towards big data, so it is commonly assumed that data means acumen and direction.
  • Any Data, by itself, does not bring clarity. Data is just information, not reality. It does not represent anything in the field of actuality.
  • Data is also, never complete. Getting more and more Data does not equate to getting more clarity.

Incomplete Data is Misleading

Our brains like to fill up incomplete information based on our prejudice and confirmation bias.

As all data is inherently incomplete, we use our minds to fill the missing information, based on the existing data we have, and that can go obverse.

4 more ideas

Enhance your Relationships

  • Give your undivided attention. Put away the cell phone, set aside your task list and quiet your internal monologue.
  • Check your personal agenda at the door. Resist the urg...

The Art of Decision-making:

  1. Get 1% smarter every day;
  2. Focus on things that don’t change or change very slowly over t...

Decision-making cascades 

... through everything you do. That's the power of compounding. If you get 1% better at understanding how the world works, how human behavior works, how economic systems function, and understanding your own brain — that 1% improvement impacts everything you do. 

Study things that never change

The best kind of knowledge is not ephemeral junk , that will be useless in a few years, but the core pillars of human knowledge and the major academic disciplines. That knowledge changes very slowly over time  and it’s a core foundation that you can build upon and grow from. 

2 more ideas

FBI's 5-Step Negotiation Strategy

  1. Active Listening: Just defending your proposal puts you at odds with your counterpart. Listening "without judging" and ensuring the other knows you're doing so lets you under...

Seneca

“As long as you live, keep learning how to live.”

Seneca

A personal Philosophy

We all need personal philosophy in life or we risk wandering and responding to random stimuli and information with little or no impact on our long-term goals.

Marcus Aurelius

Marcus Aurelius

“You could leave life right now. Let that determine what you do and say and think.”

7 more ideas

What it takes to love someone

We all want to share our lives with another person. The compassion, intimacy, and understanding that comes with love give life a special meaning.

To love is to want to own. We want someone wh...

Love is selfish

We want to become a part of our partners. We want to know their thoughts, history, beliefs, the way they see the world. We want to give the people in our lives things because in doing so we are becoming a part of their lives and therefore owning a piece of their history.

All these things revolve around you as a lover. You are all that really matters in the equation.

Loving an interpretation

You love people for the way they look and act. You love them for the way you interpret that person, but your interpretations may not always be accurate and may change over time.

If you can learn to have better control of those interpretations, and the person doesn't stray too far from the outline you've created of him or her, you can happily own them until the day you die.

Survivorship Bias

Survivorship bias is a logical error that twists our understanding of the world and leads to a wrong understanding of cause and effect.

We fall into survivorship bias when we assume that suc...

Against the Odds

When we only pay attention to the exception above the normal, we end up misunderstanding reality. While there is much to learn from the anomalies, it would be a mistake to expect the same results from doing the same things. 

Cause and Effect

Survivorship bias leads us to think that coincidence is a correlation. We want the encouragement from survivorship bias so we can believe in our own capabilities, but it results in an inflated idea of how people become successful.

The fact is that success is never guaranteed. It does not mean that we shouldn't try, just that we should have a realistic understanding.

3 more ideas

Meta-Learning

It's knowing how to learn. Learning itself is a skill, and knowing how to do it well is an incredibly valuable advantage.

Merely acquiring information is not learning....

Learning has 2 phases

Learning is a two-step process:

  • Read/listen: feeding ourselves new information.
  • Process and recall what you’ve just ‘learned’: connecting new materials to what we already knew.

Remembering the right things

You should not waste your time by committing unimportant details to memory. 

Your focus should be on understanding the bigger picture, on how things relate to each other.

9 more ideas

When to Study

When to Study

Studying time is more efficient if it is spread out over many sessions throughout the semester, with a little extra right before the exam.

Cover each piece of info five times from when you fi...

What and How to Study

Testing yourself, so you have to retrieve the information from memory, works much better than repeatedly reviewing the information, or creating a concept map (mind map).

After the first time learning the material, spend the subsequent studying to recalling the information, solving a problem or explaining the idea without glancing at the source.

What Kinds of Practice to Do

For a particular exam, use the following:
  • Mock tests and exams that are identical in style and form.
  • Redo problems from assignments, textbook questions or quizzes.
  • Generate your own questions or writing prompts based on the material.

2 more ideas