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The Four Desires Driving All Human Behavior: Bertrand Russell's Magnificent Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

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https://www.brainpickings.org/2015/09/21/bertrand-russell-nobel-prize-acceptance-speech/

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The Four Desires Driving All Human Behavior: Bertrand Russell's Magnificent Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech
Bertrand Russell (May 18, 1872-February 2, 1970) endures as one of humanity's most lucid and luminous minds - an oracle of timeless wisdom on everything from what "the good life" really means to why "fruitful monotony" is essential for happiness to love, sex, and our moral superstitions.

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Infinite desires

Infinite desires

Bertrand Russell, at his Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech, pointed out that all human activity is prompted by desireIf you want to know what man will do, you must know the whole...

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Acquisitiveness

Acquisitiveness is the desire to possess as much as possible of goods, or the title of goods

Regardless of how much you acquire, you will always wish for more.

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Rivalry

Many men will happily face impoverishment if they can thereby manage to ruin their rivals.


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Vanity

People desire to be admired. Vanity needs glory for its satisfaction. 

Even from childhood, children are always performing some antic, and demand to be looked at.

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The love of power

Power is insatiable: the vice of energetic men and the strongest drive in the lives of important men. The more power is experienced, the greater the love of power.

In an autocratic...

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Love of power is not always negative

From the need to dominate the unknown comes the desires like the pursuit of knowledge and all scientific progress.
How you use this power depends upon the social system and your abilities.

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The love of excitement

The desire to escape from boredom is very powerful to almost all human beings. 

But a great deal of modern work is sedentary so we most find other means to use our physical energ...

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Plato And Socrates on Living a Moral Life

  • The Greek philosopher Socrates stated that it is better to suffer and die than to be corrupted and use one’s wealth and power in a dishonourable way.
  • Plato claimed that being morally good has an inner harmony, while a dishonest, wicked person is always at unease, and in a disharmonious state of being.

Morality and Religions

  • Believers Of God, both in east and west, believe that good, pious deeds and intentions are rewarded by God; many people do not receive their reward in this life.
  • Hindus believe that Karma will ensure that their good deeds will be rewarded, while evil actions and desires will be punished, either in this life or in future lives.

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Early History

The connection between genius and possible insanity was first documented in 1891 in the Italian physicians’ book The Man Of Genius.

In 1869, this was taken up by the cousin of Charles Darwi...

Genius and Heredity

In a 1904 study by English physician Havelock Ellis, a list was made of 1030 individuals through extensive research, examining thoroughly the intellectual distinction people had by the various factors like heredity, general health, and social class.


These works established that genius minds are often hereditary.

Genetic Studies Of Genius

A body of work of Stanford psychologist Lewis M. Terman, was an in-depth multi-decade study of gifted individuals, and an attempt to improve the measurement of genius and its association with the degradation of mental stability. This also included an enhanced version of the French IQ (Intelligence Quotient) test.

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We don’t ask big questions

Big questions referring to is the meaning of life matter deeply because only with sound answers to them we can direct our energies meaningfully, but most of us get shy expressing them. -...

Philosophy = thinking for yourself

Philosophers are interested in asking whether an idea is logical–rather than simply assuming it must be right because it is popular and long-established. - Alain de Botton

Philosophers were the first therapists

Philosophers teach us to think about our emotions, rather than simply have them. By understanding and analysing our feelings, we learn to see how emotions impact on our behaviour in unexpected, counterintuitive and sometimes dangerous ways.  - Alain de Botton

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