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The Introvert's Guide to Leadership Presence - Quiet Revolution

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The Introvert's Guide to Leadership Presence - Quiet Revolution
They've all been described as "introverts," yet they all project leadership presence-not by getting louder or by ramping up their energy, but by being stronger authentically . If you're an introvert, you don't need to change your personality to develop leadership presence. You just need to learn a few skills.

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Introverts and authenticity

If you’re an introvert, you don’t need to change your personality to develop leadership presence. You just need to learn a few skills.

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Balance

Quieter people tend to make themselves small, tight. You don't have to make yourself large, just centered.

  • If you’re standing, get in a strong stance: put one foot slightl...

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Eye contact

You may struggle with eye contact and need to learn how to focus your gaze to build leadership presence.

But controlling your gaze is not about going eyeball to eyeball. You have to tr...

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Vocal resonance

You need to resonate your voice in your mouth, not your nasal passages or your throat.

To see what it feels like to have your voice resonate in your mouth, make an “mm” sound so that y...

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Smooth gestures

Keep your gestures fluid if you want to highlight your message and build your leadership presence.

If you are continuously moving your hands in the same way, you are connecting your be...

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Strategic movement

Don’t just pace around the room—move with purpose.

  • You can move between points like through the white space between paragraphs. 
  • You can also use movement to create h...

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Introverted vs. extroverted people

If you recover your energy while alone or in quiet surroundings, you’re probably an introverted type of person.

You can experience the benefits of both types when you push yourself to ...

Introverted vs. shy/insecure people

There’s nothing wrong with being an introvert. If you are emotionally unstable, being an introvert can become the biggest enemy of your progress in life.
There’s a big difference between being an introvert and being afraid of public speaking, meeting people and speaking up when necessary. Social anxiety is not introversion, it’s a fear you must face and overcome.

Thinking before speaking and acting

  • Make sure that you speak up when you have something important to say. 
  • Take advantage of your ability to observe other people, the environment you’re in and the energy flow in the room.
  • People will pay more attention to what you say when you do speak up.
  • You probably have the ability to study things better and faster, so when you do say something make sure that it’s an eye-opener.
  • People will trust you more and thus you’ll have access to more privileged information.

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Body Language

Is the unspoken element of communication that we use to reveal our true feelings and emotions - gestures, facial expressions and posture.

When we are able t...

Disinterested interlocutors

Signs of a disengaged, disinterested or unhappy audience:

  • Arms folded in front of the body.
  • Minimal or tense facial expression.
  • Body turned away from you.
  • Eyes downcast, maintaining little contact.

Being aware of these signs can help you to adjust what you say and how you say it, so you can make him feel more at ease and receptive to your viewpoint

Unengaged Audiences

Some signs that people may be bored or disinterested in what you're saying:

  • Sitting slumped, with heads downcast.
  • Gazing at something else, or into space.
  • Fidgeting, picking at clothes, or fiddling with pens and phones.
  • Writing or doodling.

When you notice that, you can re-engage people by asking a direct question, or by inviting people to contribute an idea.

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More Positive Than Negative Feedback

High-performing organizations deliver roughly five times as many positive statements (supportive, appreciative, encouraging) as negative ones (critical, disapproving, contradictory). That’s because...

Focus On The Positive Parts

We tend to focus on giving employees critical feedback. But, by focusing on their weaknesses, we only create competence. By focusing on their strengths, we create excellence.

Give equal measures of positive and negative feedback. We usually gloss over the strengths, but focus in great detail on the critical feedback. Add examples and details to your positive feedback.

Emphasize Collaboration

Be objective when you speak about a negative event. Rather than placing blame or evaluating the problematic situation, describe it and its consequences, and suggest acceptable alternatives.

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