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The Myth of the Brainstorming Session

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https://thenextweb.com/entrepreneur/2013/11/03/myth-brainstorming-session-best-ideas-dont-always-come-meetings/

thenextweb.com

The Myth of the Brainstorming Session
Over dinner a couple months ago, one of my friends said he needed some help coming up with a name for a new website. He told me a bit about the site and asked if I could help think of something over dinner.

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The 2 goals of effective brainstorming:

The 2 goals of effective brainstorming:
  • Defer judgment (don’t get upset when people say bad ideas).
  • Reach for quantity (come up with as many ideas as possible).

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Obstacles to an effective brainstorming:

  • Fear of judgment from people in positions of power;
  • Extroverts take center stage;
  • Groups hate scary ideas, even it the...

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Steps of the creative process

  1. Preparation: individual study to focus your mind on the problem;
  2. Incubation: the problem enters your unconscious mind and n...

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Better Mind Map

The Better Mind Map

Combining the Mind Map Technique with the Creativity Triggers Technique.

The novelty of The Better Mind Map is in the custom triggers tailored to a specific challenge. It is a t...

How The Better Mind Map works

  • Write your design challenge or problem in the center of a blank piece of paper and circle it.
  • Add the following five Topic Areas around the central challenge: User needs, Inspiration, Constraints, Commercial drivers, Service design triggers.
  • In the Service design triggers Area, Pick 3 triggers from Entertainment, Simplified/light, Adaptable, Economical, Integrated, Durable.
  • Consolidate what you know about each topic area into 3 triggers each.

Sketching ideas

From your mind map:
  • Divide a piece of paper into six sections.
  • Dedicate each section to a sketched idea, based on a single trigger from your Better Mind Map

Restrict yourself

Research suggests placing self-imposed limitations can boost creativity. 

It forces your brain to come up with creative solutions to finish a project around the parameters you’ve ...

Re-conceptualize the problem

Instead of thinking of a cut-and-dry end goal to certain situations, creative people sit back and examine the problem in different ways before beginning to work.

If you find yourself stagnating by focusing on generic problems, try to re-conceptualize the problem by focusing on a more meaningful angle.

For example: Instead of thinking “What would be something cool to paint?” rather ask, “What sort of painting evokes the feeling of loneliness that we all encounter after a break-up?”

Create psychological distance

Creating “psychological” distance may be useful for breaking through a creative block.

Try to imagine your creative task as being disconnected and distant from your current position/location - this may make the problem more accessible and can encourage higher level thinking.

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The right side of the brain

The right side of the brain

Creativity isn’t the preserve of one side of the brain, and it isn’t a talent confined to people with a special kind of brain. If you’re human and you’ve got a brain, you’re capabl...

The “Eureka!” moment

This myth encourages the belief that creativity is a passive process. It suggests you have to wait and hope that you’ll make a breakthrough.

That Eureka moment is actually the last step in a long, involved process and not the only step. For this to happen, your unconscious mind needs material to work with. You have to put in the hard work of studying and mastering your field and exposing yourself to different perspectives.

The lone, eccentric geniuses

In reality, creativity is a team sport.

The lone genius myth is a stereotype and it’s unhelpful because it suggests the route to innovation is to cut oneself off from colleagues and collaboration. You need a modest amount of intelligence to be creative, but extremely high IQ is neither sufficient nor necessary for being an innovator.

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