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The Thinking Ladder

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https://waitbutwhy.com/2019/09/thinking-ladder.html

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The Thinking Ladder
This is Chapter 7 in a blog series. If you're new to the series, visit the series home page Part 3: Thinking, in 3D for the full table of contents. Chapter 7: The Thinking Ladder ___________ "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves and wise people so full of doubts.

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The Way We See The World

Each of us looks at things differently, and it's largely based on our thinking patterns, education levels, inherent bias, self-identity, and real, first-hand experiences.

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Higher Mind Vs Primitive Mind

Human beings tend to have two kinds of conflicting mindsets:

  • The Higher Mind, the conscious truth-seeking mind, has made human beings an advanced civilization.
  • The Primitive Mind...

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The Psych Spectrum

Our Higher Mind and the Primitive Mind always have a tug-of-war like conflict. The degree of the conflict can be placed in a spectrum, which is called a Psych Spectrum.

If the Higher ...

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The Primitive Mind

If we are low on the Psych Spectrum, our Primitive Mind is in charge, which means:

  • We are short-sighted
  • We act small-minded and  emotional
  • We behave in an egoistic w...

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The 4 Rungs of Thinking

  1. The Scientist, for whom Truth is important. It approaches anything with objectivity and accepts that there are things still unknown.
  2. The Sports Fan, for whom along with the truth, conf...

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Gathering New Information

  • While gathering new information, the Scientist Mindset goes for unbiased and broad information gathering. 
  • The Sports Fan Mindset has confirmation bias so cherry-p...

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Evaluating and Judging

Truth-based mindset judges others by the way they think (HOW), while confirmation based mindset judges others by WHAT they think.

Truth based mindsets also have original viewpoints based on a...

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Conviction and Worldview

The Unbiased scientific thinker strives to arrive at the truth using knowledge and conviction in equal measure. His vision is clear but he believes that obtaining real knowledge is hard and the wor...

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Self-Awareness of Mindsets

Upwards of the Psych Spectrum, we see objective thinking and lack of ego, ready to accept the truth after we find it, rationally and by following an unbiased process.

As we go down the Spectr...

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Matured Thinking

It is a process. As each of us is essentially getting better in our thinking, maturing to grow up psychologically, we are climbing to the higher rungs of the Psych Spectrum.

While we are in t...

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Bertrand Russell
“The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves and wise people so full of doubts.”...

Bertrand Russell

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

The Real Career Landscape

The Real Career Landscape
If you can figure out how to get a reasonably accurate picture of the real career landscape out there, you have a massive edge over everyone else, most of whom will be using outdated convention...

The career pitfall

Careers used to be kind of like a 40-year tunnel. You picked your tunnel, and once you were in, that was that. You worked in that profession for 40 years or so before the tunnel spit you out on the other side into your retirement.

Today’s career landscape isn’t a lineup of tunnels, it’s a massive, impossibly complex, rapidly changing science laboratory. 

Why Career-path-carving is important.

Time. A typical career will take up somewhere between 20% and 60% of your meaningful adult time.

Quality of Life. Your career has a major effect on all your non-career hours.

Impact. Whatever shape your career path ends up taking, the world will be altered by it.

Identity. We tell people about our careers by telling them what we are.

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Critical thinking...

...doesn’t happen because you’ve studied some abstract logical form and come to valid deductions.

 It happens because you know enough about how the world works to rule out certain...

The right way to improve critical thinking

  • Create contexts that enable smart decisions: recognize what you’re actually doing when you’re reasoning about things and use this knowledge to try to avoid making common mistakes
  • Absorb lots and lots of knowledge about the world and integrate it through practice making decisions:  more you know about things, the better you can reason about them.
  • Debating problems

    Many well-known problems of human reasoning disappear once you get a group of people together and let them talk about it.

    It's a good way to see your ideas refuted or let stronger ideas win the day. Although there’s a risk of group think and conformity pressures, if you take a large and diverse enough group, you’re more likely to be exposed to the best reasoning, which will tend to win out over the majority opinion.

    Types Of People Who Blame

    • People who can always find something else to blame.
    • People who blame themselves for everything, even when they’ve had nothing to do with an unfortunate outcome.
    • People who blam...

    Why People Blame Themselves

    This isn’t just false modesty or fishing for reassurance; some people do believe that they cause every bad thing all or most of the time.

    Blaming yourself when something goes wrong might, relates to a general tendency to make internal attributions for failure in which you see yourself as inept, foolish, or irresponsible. That tendency might motivate you to attribute your successes to external factors, such as fate, chance or luck, as well. 

    Blame And Consequence

    Theoretically, anyone who intentionally practices an immoral act is culpable regardless of the consequences. But in most cases, people sign up for what is called “moral luck”.

    Moral luck is the belief that you should hold someone to blame only if the action causes harm to others, not for their intent, and according to it, those whose actions bring harm are more culpable.

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