deepstash

Beta

The three human forces that drive design solutions

Deepstash brings you key ideas from the most inspiring articles like this one:

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

https://uxdesign.cc/the-three-human-forces-that-drive-design-solutions-a19d8ad19553

uxdesign.cc

The three human forces that drive design solutions
How to use these forces to design things people want. "Solve a problem people have" - every business 101 lesson ever taught. Everyone who builds a business or designs a product dreams about making things people want. But anyone who's tried it knows it's not that simple.

2

Key Ideas

Save all ideas

Design creates Desirability

The No. 1 reason startups fail is that they try to build something that nobody wants.

People adopt and endorse something which they feel they want at a primal level, with the design appeal of...

90 SAVES


The Three Forces

Creating something that people would desire requires examining the three main forces involved.

  • The Person: The kind of person the product or service is targeted towards, his likes...

123 SAVES


SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Lifestyle Gamification

Lifestyle Gamification

It is when you to turn a task into a game to motivate yourself to finish it.

It motivates the "player" to chase after rewards as he gets points and achieve new levels with new challen...

What Makes Games Addictive

  • Epic meaning and calling to finish a mission.
  • Development and accomplishment inspires us to finish the game.
  • Empowerment of creativity to bring imagination to life.
  • Ownership and possession of rewards.
  • Social influence and relatedness or envy.
  • Scarcity and impatience to have things we don't have.
  • Undpredictability and curiosity of what the next challenges are.
  • Loss coins and chances and avoidance of failure.

Be a Game Master

Attach rewards to your to do list. 
  • Reward yourself for fulfilling one or several tasks

Use surprise rewards.

  • Determine a reward by chance.

Engage in time-based challenges

Make a deal with your friend.

  • Challenge and motivate each other to finish a task

2 more ideas

Simple rules

They are shortcut strategies that save time and effort by focusing our attention and simplifying the way we process information. The rules aren’t universal- they’re tailored to the particular si...

Boundary rules for better decisions

They guide the choice of what to do (and not do) without requiring a lot of time, analysis, or information. 

They work well for categorical choices, like a judge’s yes-or-no decision on a defendant’s bail, and decisions requiring many potential opportunities to be screened quickly. 

These rules also come in handy when time, convenience, and cost matter.

Prioritizing rules for better decisions

They rank options to help decide which of multiple paths to pursue.

They are especially powerful when applied to bottleneck activities - pinch-points in companies, where the number of opportunities swamps available resources, and prioritizing rules can ensure that these resources are deployed where they can have the greatest impact.

one more idea

Focus on what matters

  • Write down the end goal.
  • Divide the goal into specific actions you need to take to get there. Think in terms of systems: focussed, routine actions that you can do daily.
  • List a...

Steve Jobs

Steve Jobs

“Deciding what not to do is as important as deciding what to do. It’s true for companies, and it’s true for products."

Seek Simplicity

  • Find out if the problem really exists, and why. This will open a path to alternative ways of solving it.
  • Some problems, which seem complex, often have simple solutions.
  • What is the surest thing in that complex problem? That becomes your First Principle, your starting point.
  • List out the possible solutions
  • Focus on one good solution while removing the rest.

8 more ideas