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The Way We Write History Has Changed

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https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2020/01/smartphone-archives-history-photography/605284/

theatlantic.com

The Way We Write History Has Changed
A deep dive into an archive will never be the same.

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Difference between libraries and archives

History comes out of an archive, not a library.

  • Libraries spread knowledge that's been collected and compressed into books and other media.
  • Archives are where colle...

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Archives and the digitization of knowledge

Unlike libraries, archives have generally resisted the digitization of knowledge. They are still mostly paper where you might spend weeks to months working through all the boxes of interest.

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The tools are changing

With the use of smartphones, instead of reading papers during an archival visit, historians take digital photos of the documents to look at them later.

The practice might seem insignificant, ...

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Archives for the modern mind

With digitization, archives are now accessed through many mediums by more than just the historian. 

Different types of people outside the professionalized historical tradition could do h...

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How history could change

With the ability to capture more documents, the depth of archival work will increase. At the same time, because you are able to find relevant information beyond your project, you may los...

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Spreading of diseases

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165 A.D.: The Antonine Plague

It may have been an early appearance of smallpox that began with the Huns.
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