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Unless You Track Your Progress, Setting Goals Is a Waste of Effort

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https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/321532

entrepreneur.com

Unless You Track Your Progress, Setting Goals Is a Waste of Effort
4 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. I've always carried a notebook with me at work and on business trips. I usually jot down notes from meetings or random thoughts I have on how to improve our company. Recently, I found some of my old notebooks and I started flipping through the pages.

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Goals should get measured

Two-thirds of senior managers can’t name their firms’ top priorities and more than 80% of small business owners don’t keep track of business goals.

So the problem is that while comp...

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Own your goals

Once you’ve written down a company or a team goal, two questions arise. Who is responsible for the goal (accountability), and h...

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Tracking goals with meetings

Track your progress towards said goal week by week. This is called continuous performance review. 

Weekly status meetings are used in most companies. But you have to ...

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Having an impact every day

Christina Wodtke, author of “Radical Focus”,

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