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What is Eudaimonia? Aristotle and Eudaimonic Well-Being

What is Eudaimonia? Aristotle and Eudaimonic Well-Being

https://positivepsychology.com/eudaimonia/

positivepsychology.com

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Defining Eudaimonia

Defining Eudaimonia

Eudaimonia is a term which comes from Aristotle’s work called ‘Nicomachean Ethics’ and means individual well-being and happiness. It combines the prefix eu (meaning good) ...

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Plato And Eudaimonism

  • Plato believed that because we feel unhappy internally when we do something wrong, eudaimonia is the highest feeling of moral thought and behaviour where there is real happiness from within....

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Aristotle And Eudaimonism

Aristotle in his many works has provided numerous interpretations of eudaimonia, explaining it as something reflecting the pursuit of virtue, excellence and the best within us. According to him, eu...

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Aristotle

“…Some identify happiness with virtue, some with practical wisdom, others with a kind of philosophic wisdom, others with these, or one of these, accompanied by pleasure or not without pleasure;...

Aristotle

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A Sinful Or Virtuous Life

  • A life of satisfying one’s appetites, like material wealth, lust, power is a life suitable to beasts and is a laughable way to live.

  • A rational life with empathy, virtu...

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Subjective Well Being and Psychological Well Being

Subjective Well Being (SWB) and Psychological Well Being (PWB) are two modern equivalents of the psychological research on Eudaimonia, for psychologists and behavioural scientists studying the defi...

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Eudaimonic Well-being (EWB)

It is defined in the modern context as: “quality of life derived from the development of a person’s best potentials and their application in the fulfillment of personally expressive, self-conc...

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How To Achieve Eudaimonia

  • Know what life goals you have, what you strive for, your core beliefs and drivers of life.
  • Focus your capabilities and skills towards the attainme...

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Hedonic Well-Being

Hedonic pleasures like consumerism or gluttony are the more visible, accessible and immediate ways to attain an instant jolt of happiness, however temporary.

While eudaimonic well ...

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Implementing psychological well being

Eudaimonic activities that can be practically pursued:

  • Seeking to pursue excellence in one’s life.
  • Following one’s beliefs.
  • Using one’s core competencies.

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Pursuing happiness

Pursuing happiness

We all say we want to be happy, but happiness is often out of our grasp. Maybe the problem is not so much with us, but with the concept of happiness.

A better concept i...

Eudaimonia

Unlike happiness, eudaimonia is not an emotion: It is a state of being or doing. It is more stable and cannot so quickly be taken away from us.

Eudaimonia is a much deeper and richer concept than happiness and is viewed in terms of living a worthwhile life. It has everything to do with hard work.

Socrates and Plato on Eudaimonia

Socrates equated eudaimonia with wisdom and virtue, stating that he who is not wise cannot be happy.

Plato broadly agreed with Socrates. Plato writes that justice and injustice are to the soul as health and disease are to the body. For Plato, an unjust man cannot be happy because he is not in ordered control of himself.

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One of the reasons why Stoicism is enjoying a revival today is that it gives concrete answers to moral questions.

Aristotle gave us an alternative conception of happiness

It cannot be acquired by pleasurable experiences but only by identifying and realizing our own potential, moral and creative, in our specific environments, with our particular family, friends and colleagues, and helping others to do so. 

The Meaning of a Good Life

The Meaning of a Good Life

One of the oldest philosophical questions is the meaning of living well. Philosophers have delved into the hidden complexities of how should one live and what is the concept of the good lif...

Plato And Socrates on Living a Moral Life

  • The Greek philosopher Socrates stated that it is better to suffer and die than to be corrupted and use one’s wealth and power in a dishonourable way.
  • Plato claimed that being morally good has an inner harmony, while a dishonest, wicked person is always at unease, and in a disharmonious state of being.

Morality and Religions

  • Believers Of God, both in east and west, believe that good, pious deeds and intentions are rewarded by God; many people do not receive their reward in this life.
  • Hindus believe that Karma will ensure that their good deeds will be rewarded, while evil actions and desires will be punished, either in this life or in future lives.

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