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Why Feeling Close to the Finish Line Makes You Push Harder

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https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-feeling-close-to-the-finish-line-makes-you-push-harder/

scientificamerican.com

Why Feeling Close to the Finish Line Makes You Push Harder
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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The Goal Gradient Hypothesis

The Goal Gradient Hypothesis

The Goal Gradient hypothesis states that we push harder or are motivated to exert more by the fact that the goal is almost within reach.

The knowledge that the desired outc...

164 SAVES


The "Buy Ten Get One Free" Line

Marketers use this to nudge us towards buying a certain product or service, providing us with a goal that is almost within our grasp.

Example: When enrolled in a buy t...

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Offering Free Bonus Points

Studies show that if a person is offered a bonus reward or push, he or she is more likely to complete the goal as he has been provided with a further incentive and help to reach a ...

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Understanding The Psychology of a Goal Gradient

This helps us manage our motivation, as it focuses our energy and motivation.

The downside is that we are focused on the goal in front of us and are now s...

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Detached Goal Setting

A great way to manage your projects and goals is to have a detached mindset about them while trying to sort and prioritize them.

After the sorting, take the most important...

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SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

Why We Avoid Asking For Advice

Why We Avoid Asking For Advice

Most people shy away from asking for advice when they cannot figure out how to finish a tricky task or assignment at work.

  • Reasons range from not wanting to bother anyone, or not tru...

Advice Seekers Appear Smarter

The fear of appearing incompetent or an incompetent person is misplaced, as research shows that the person who is asked for advice thinks good of the person asking.

Advice seekers appear smarter to the person whose ego is now stroke, making him provide valuable insights while being impressed by the seeker. Being asked for advice increases the level of perceived competency of the seeker in the eyes of the expert.

Connection Made Thorugh Advice

Asking for advice leads to a series of interactions at the office, which gives way to exchanging information, learning and builds a meaningful connection that goes beyond the initial request for advice.

one more idea

E-mail rudeness is a pervasive problem

E-mail rudeness is a pervasive problem

Studies show that more than ninety percent of professionals surveyed admitted that they had experienced disrespectful e-mails at work.

Rude e-mails are on the rise. The e-mail may ...

The derogatory or condescending e-mail

Electronic communication is efficient, but it's detached. Sitting at a computer screen, the need for tact and a respectful tone disappears.

  • Being on the receiving end of such impoliteness can create lingering stress and negative emotions. The recipient may find it harder to stay engaged at work. The stress associated with e-mail rudeness can spill over into family life and, like a chain reaction, can send stress signals to other people.
  • A subtler form of aggression is failing to reply to a request, in effect giving others the "silent treatment." Not responding to an email leaves people hanging and struggling with uncertainty.

Remember your netiquette

With remote work on the rise, the use of electronic communication has allowed incivility to thrive.

  • To mitigate the stress, managers need to set clear and reasonable e-mail expectations. Organizations should create meaningful opportunities for employees to build good working relationships.
  • For employees, the best option to cope is to unplug from work after-hours.
  • Regardless of your level of stress, remember the rules of netiquette. Spend time composing your e-mail and notice inconsiderate expressions. Acknowledge a request and let your co-workers know when you will get back to them. Perhaps keep caps lock off.

Recognizing mirrored motion

Recognizing mirrored motion

Italian neuroscientists first noticed the "mirror neuron system." The brain recognizes a kind of micro-kinship.

When we watch a video of someone else smelling...

The challenges of live self-stream

  • The non-mirror-style self. We are used to seeing ourselves mirror-style. When you move your left hand, it will always be flipped when you view yourself in a mirror. On Zoom, you lift your left hand, and the opposite side moves on Zoom. This feels disorientating. Thankfully, Zoom has fixed this.
  • The perfect self-contingency detection. When you lift your hand in front of a mirror, there is no lag in the image. Now you feel your arm stir and see it move a few seconds later. No wonder we stare at ourselves.
  • Glitchy wifi magnifies the slight asynchrony. The response delay disrupts your feeling of connection with another person. You can't read them, and they can't read you.
  • A documented phenomenon is that we accurately recognize neutral expressions on other faces, but we misidentify our own expressions. We see our own expression as unfavorable most of the time.