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Why religion is not going away and science will not destroy it - Peter Harrison | Aeon Ideas

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Why religion is not going away and science will not destroy it - Peter Harrison | Aeon Ideas
In 1966, just over 50 years ago, the distinguished Canadian-born anthropologist Anthony Wallace confidently predicted the global demise of religion at the hands of an advancing science: 'belief in supernatural powers is doomed to die out, all over the world, as a result of the increasing adequacy and diffusion of scientific knowledge'.

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Secularism's Rise is Halted

A Social Sciences prediction that all cultures would converge and become something resembling the secular, western liberal democracy has proven to be false.

There is a shift in many countries...

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A decline in Religious Belief

  • Religious belief has seen a steady decline across the world.
  • Close to 30% of people in Australia claim to have no religion, and countries like western Europe report low levels of relig...

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David Martin

"There is no consistent relation between the degree of scientific advance and a reduced profile of religious influence, belief and practice.:

David Martin

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Secularisation Forecasts

Early Leaders of an Independent India incorrectly believed that ancient Hinduism and the Muslim efforts of a theocracy based on Islam, would both surrender to secularisation. In the US, as a ...

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Science Vs Religion

  • Science and Religion were historically being studied in a 'conflict model' where theological and scientific views were put in loggerheads with each other.
  • This contributed to a mistake...

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We cannot understand ourselves if we do not understand others. Getting to know others requires avoiding the twin dangers of overestimating either how much we have in common or how much divides ...

To travel around the world’s philosophies is an opportunity to challenge beliefs we take for granted. By gaining greater knowledge of how others think, we can become less certain of the...

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We should not be afraid to ground ourselves in our own traditions, but we should not be bound by them.

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