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Why We Forget Most of the Books We Read

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https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2018/01/what-was-this-article-about-again/551603/

theatlantic.com

Why We Forget Most of the Books We Read
and the movies and TV shows we watch Pamela Paul's memories of reading are less about words and more about the experience. "I almost always remember where I was and I remember the book itself. I remember the physical object," says Paul, the editor of The New York Times Book Review, who reads, it is fair to say, a lot of books.

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The Forgetting Curve

Our memories have a 'forgetting curve', and unless we review what we see or learn, most of the content is forgotten in 24 hours, and the rest in the following days.

Due to the Interne...

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Memories Are Associations

The more information that is available to us, the more we are unable to retain it. Memory means association and most information we consume may be simply buried inside, lurking deep in, ...

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Memories Get Interwoven

The art and culture we engage our brains in turn into memories which can be unpredictable and fickle.

The books we read, the songs we hear and the movies we watch become interwoven and enta...

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Our memory is made up of 3 components

...in terms of reading retention:

  • Impression
  • Association
  • Repetition

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