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10 Tips To Learn Any Language From An Expert

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Use the 360° maximalist approach: no matter which learning tools you use, it’s crucial to practice your new language every single day.

Really, really go for it and try to use it throughout the day. Try to think in it, try to write in it, try to speak to myself even in that language.

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10 Tips To Learn Any Language From An Expert

10 Tips To Learn Any Language From An Expert

https://www.babbel.com/en/magazine/10-tips-from-an-expert

babbel.com

10

Key Ideas

Know your motivation

If you don’t have a good reason to learn a language, you are less likely to stay motivated over the long-run.

Once you’ve decided on a language, it’s crucial to commit.

Find a partner

Finding some kind of partner on your language adventure will push both of you to always try just a little bit harder and stay with it.

It’s a really great way of actually going about it. You have someone with whom you can speak, and that’s the idea behind learning a new language.

Talk to yourself

When you have no one else to speak to, there’s nothing wrong with talking to yourself in a foreign language.

This can keep new words and phrases fresh in your mind. It also helps build up your confidence for the next time you speak with someone.

Keep it relevant

Talking to people is one of the best ways to learn a language because it keeps the learning process relevant to you.
"The creative side is really being able to put the language that you're learning into a more useful, general, everyday setting"

Have fun with it

Think of some fun ways to practice your new language: make a radio play with a friend, draw a comic strip, write a poem or simply talk to whomever you can. 

Act like a child

The key to learning as quickly as a child may be to simply take on certain childlike attitudes. For instance, lack of self-consciousness, a desire to play in the language and willingness to make mistakes.

We learn by making mistakes. When it comes to learning a language, admitting that you don’t know everything (and being okay with that) is the key to growth and freedom. 

Leave your comfort zone

Willingness to make mistakes means being ready to put yourself in potentially embarrassing situations. It’s the only way to develop and improve.

Talk to strangers in the language, ask for directions, order food, try to tell a joke. The more often you do this, the bigger your comfort zone becomes and the more at ease you can be in new situations.

Listen

You must learn to listen before you can speak.

Every language sounds strange the first time you hear it. The more you expose yourself to it the more familiar it becomes, and the easier it is to speak it properly.

The best way to go about mastering that is actually to hear it constantly, to listen to it and to kind of visualize or imagine how that is supposed to be pronounced, because for every sound there is a specific part of the mouth or throat that we use in order to achieve that sound.

Watch others talk

Different languages make different demands on your tongue, lips and throat. Pronunciation is just as much physical as it is mental. 

If you can’t watch and imitate a native-speaker in person, watching foreign-language films and TV is a good substitute.

Dive in

Use the 360° maximalist approach: no matter which learning tools you use, it’s crucial to practice your new language every single day.

Really, really go for it and try to use it throughout the day. Try to think in it, try to write in it, try to speak to myself even in that language.

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A will to start and self-confidence is necessary as is having the courage to speak, and not being afraid of making mistakes. The key is to immerse yourself and put your whole being to the task.

Total immersion necessitates activities like listening to the radio station of the language you are learning, reading and speaking to people.

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It is a good idea to master the basic skills first and focus on the grammar later, while asking for feedback and correcting yourself, learning on-the-fly.

Invest not only your head but your heart in the learning process. Practice makes perfect.

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    The friend does not have to be a native speaker. Whenever you are stuck, use a dictionary or Google translate. But, 10% of your time should be speaking with an advanced or native speaker.

    You Can’t Find a Partner

    If you cannot find someone willing to commit to only speaking that language, hire a tutor.

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    •  Words like Action, nation, precipitation, solution, frustration, and thousands of other -tion words are spelled exactly the same in French, and you can quickly get used to the different pronunciation. Change that -tion to a -ción and you have the same words in Spanish. Italian is -zione and Portuguese is -ção.
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    • To read the language consistently, you can find cool blogs and other popular sites on Alexa’s ranking of top sites per country.

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    Read

    Read words, sentences, children’s books, newspaper articles. Read as far and near as you can, whether out loud to an audience or quietly to yourself. 

    Seeing the language in print helps you understand word structures. It also anchors the new sounds, and helps them get imprinted in your mind.

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    Don't focus on yourself or on your own mistakes. Focus on the other person you're talking to and the result you want to get.