"Tidak ada cara yang lebih halus dan pasti... - Deepstash
John Maynard Keynes

"Tidak ada cara yang lebih halus dan pasti untuk menjungkirbalikkan basis masyarakat yang ada selain merusak mata uang. Proses tersebut melibatkan semua kekuatan tersembunyi dari hukum ekonomi di sisi kehancuran, dan proses ini melakukannya dengan cara yang tidak dapat didiagnosis oleh satu dari sejuta orang pun."

JOHN MAYNARD KEYNES

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MORE IDEAS FROM Keynes on the Currency

John Maynard Keynes

"There is no subtler, surer means of overturning the existing basis of society than to debauch the currency. The process engages all the hidden forces of economic law on the side of destruction, and it does it in a manner which not one man in a million is able to diagnose."

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WWI and women working

Over a century ago, women in the UK weren't allowed to own property, open a bank account, or work in a legal or civil service job.

When WW1 broke out in 1914, over a million women joined the workforce over the next four years to keep the economy going, even in jobs that were not previously open to them.

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Adam Smith: the father of modern economics

Adam Smith was an 18th-century Scottish economist, philosopher, and author. He is considered the father of modern economics.

  • Smith was born in 1723 in Scotland. He studied moral philosophy at the University of Glasgow and enrolled in postgraduate studies at the Balliol College at Oxford University.
  • After returning to Scotland, Smith held a series of public lectures at the University of Edinburgh and earned a professorship at Glasgow University in 1751. Later he earned the position of Chair of Moral Philosophy.
  • In 1763, he accepted a more remunerative position in France. There, Smith counted philosophers David Hume and Voltaire as contemporaries.

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Busyness proselytizers suggest that Thorstein Veblen’s fin de siècle theory of “conspicuous consumption,” whereby the moneyed class establishes its status through ostentatious spending, has reversed itself: that prestige now derives from public displays of personal industriousness, not empty extravagance. 

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