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This Is How To Increase Emotional Intelligence

Social Skill

Social skills - the ability to build rapport and manage relationships — with a goal in mind.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

This Is How To Increase Emotional Intelligence

This Is How To Increase Emotional Intelligence

https://www.bakadesuyo.com/2018/01/increase-emotional-intelligence/

bakadesuyo.com

9

Key Ideas

Emotional intelligence

It's the ability to accurately perceive your own and others’ emotions, to understand the signals that emotions send about relationships, and to manage your own and others’ emotions.

The 5 components of EI

  1. Self-Awareness: understanding of one’s emotions.
  2. Self-Regulation: it frees us from being prisoners of our feelings.
  3. Motivation: having an intrinsic desire to achieve things.
  4. Empathy: the ability to understand emotions of other people.
  5. Social Skill:  the ability to build rapport and manage relationships.

There are 3 types of empathy:

  • Emotional empathy: “You feel awful? Then I feel awful too!”
  • Cognitive empathy: “I understand that you are feeling awful. That must suck.”
  • Compassion: “You feel awful? I feel for you. How can I help?”

Emotional Intelligence:

From a scientific standpoint, emotional intelligence is the ability to accurately perceive your own and others’ emotions; to understand the signals that emotions send about relationships, and to manage your own and others’ emotions.

Self-Awareness

People who have a high degree of self-awareness recognize how their feelings affect them, other people, and their job performance.

Self-Regulation

The ability to control and regulate your emotions in spite of bad moods and emotional impulses.

If you feel your emotions surging, turn your attention to your breath. Focus on it going in and out. When your mind wanders, return your attention to your breath. Give it 10-20 seconds at first. Neuroscience says even a little bit can calm those feelings and get your head on straight.

Motivation

Having an intrinsic desire to achieve and accomplish things.

Boost your motivation by tracking your accomplishments. Keep a list of everything you’ve accomplished today where you can see it.

Empathy

The ability to understand the emotional makeup of other people.

There are three distinct types of empathy:

  • Emotional empathy: “You feel awful? Then I feel awful too!”
  • Cognitive empathy: “I understand that you are feeling awful. That must suck.”
  • Compassion: “You feel awful? I feel for you. How can I help?”

Compassion is what we focus on for EI.

Social Skill

Social skills - the ability to build rapport and manage relationships — with a goal in mind.

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