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The Ben Franklin effect - Quartz Obsession

The Ben Franklin Effect Mechanism

Most believe that this effect results from cognitive dissonance - when a behavior (helping someone) contradicts our beliefs (disliking the helped one). 

To lessen the unpleasantness of the contradiction, our brains think that we may like that person.

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The Ben Franklin effect - Quartz Obsession

The Ben Franklin effect - Quartz Obsession

https://qz.com/emails/quartz-obsession/1603343/

qz.com

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Key Ideas

The Reverse Ben Franklin Effect

Research indicates that the meaner you are to someone, the more you’ll dislike them—even without real cause.

This reverse Ben Franklin effect may help explain how soldiers are able to kill enemies, why prison staff can become needlessly cruel to inmates, and generational feuds.

The Ben Franklin Effect Mechanism

Most believe that this effect results from cognitive dissonance - when a behavior (helping someone) contradicts our beliefs (disliking the helped one). 

To lessen the unpleasantness of the contradiction, our brains think that we may like that person.

The Ben Franklin Effect

It happens when asking someone for a favor makes them like you more. 

This is believed to work because our brains try to solve the dissonance between helping someone and not being interested in their well-being by liking them.

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As a leader, when facing a crisis, you have to adopt the best position in order to ensure the efficiency of your action. And, most importantly, this action has to be taken as fast as possible. ...

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The “First 15 Minutes” crisis management checklist:

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  • prepare an initial 'holding statement' in order to make your opinion pubic. Make sure the statement goes viral fast.
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  • follow up on everything that you have engaged yourself to fulfill.
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Dealing with a crisis increases the risk of taking bad decisions. When times get harder:

  • don't lie, minimize the situation or make jokes regarding the crisis.
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  • don't hurry to issue a denial unless you have all the facts.
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Doomscrolling

This is a term that describes the habit of endlessly scrolling social media and news feeds full of doom and gloom on one’s smartphone screen, something which is eroding our mental health.

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You must challenge yourself to take action sooner rather than later.

Planning and strategizing are important parts of the beginning of a new project, but be careful not to lose yourself indefinitely in these steps.

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Blame is nothing but an easy way out of taking responsibility for your own outcomes. It’s a lot easier to point a finger at someone or something else instead of looking within yourself. 

Blame is not constructive; it does not help you or anyone else.

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