What is a Neutron Star? - Deepstash
What is a Neutron Star?

What is a Neutron Star?

Neutron Stars are the most dense category of stars that form when a star collapses in on itself. These stars have 1.4 solar masses (1.4 times larger than our sun) and have a radius of 6.2 miles. The reason they have the name "Neutron Stars" is also because it is believed that they are comprised of mostly neutrons.

Neutron Stars also lose the ability to generate heat because of how tightly packed the particles are against each other. Despite this surface cooling, it may still be very hot due through further collisions with other stars or an accretion (a gravitationally bound disk of particles).

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What are Black Holes?

When I was a small boy I wondered that what is in the black hole then I do a lot of research and found that black holes are a sphere of time where gravity is so strong that light cannot escape from it. The region which surrounds the black hole is called event horizon (This name is soo cool !). IN 1965 the great astrophysicist, Stephan Hawking proved mathematically that black holes exist in the universe. The theory of general relativity predicts that the compact mass can deform spacetime to form a black hole. Thanks for reading. 

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What are Supernova?

Supernova are stellar explosions that take place when a star reaches its final stages of life. Research shows that they occur once every 3 centuries however the remnants of these explosions take a long time to reach us. 

Supernova can also take place if a star develops and iron core that is larger than the Chandrasekar mass (the largest mass that a star can reach before imploding). 

When these events do take place, they can be up to five billion times brighter than the sun!

All in all, supernova are very dangerous, but very interesting scientific phenomena.

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Gymnasts and star-forming clouds

When Olympic athletes perform dazzling feats of athletic prowess, they are using the same principles of physics that gave birth to stars and planets.

Conservation of angular momentum tells us that when a spinning object changes how its matter is distributed, it changes its rate of spin.

Conservation of angular momentum links the formation of planets in star-forming clouds to the beauty of a gymnast's spinning dismount from the uneven bars.

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