The human brain evolved ,too .

The human brain evolved ,too .

  • We don't have one brain in our head—we have three. We started with a “lizard brain” to keep us breathing, then added a brain like a cat’s, and then topped those with the thin layer of Jell-O known as the cortex—the third, and powerful, “human” brain.
  • We were not the strongest on the planet but we developed the strongest brains, the key to our survival. The strongest brains survive, not the strongest bodies. Our ability to solve problems, learn from mistakes, and create alliances with other people helps us survive.
  • Our ability to understand each other is our chief survival tool.

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Brain Rules

Brain Rules

by John Medina

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Exercise boosts brain power .

•Our brains were built for walking - 12 miles a day !

• To improve your thinking skills, move.

• Exercise gets blood to your brain, bringing it glucose for energy and oxygen to soak up the toxic electrons that are left over. It also stimulates the protein that keeps neurons connecting.

• Aerobic exercise just twice a week halves your risk of general dementia. It cuts your risk of Alzheimer’s by 60 percent. 

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They are shortcut strategies that save time and effort by focusing our attention and simplifying the way we process information. The rules aren’t universal- they’re tailored to the particular situation and the person using them.

We use simple rules to guide decision making every day.

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Movement

You don't have to do something too intense, just get moving to energize your brain and body.

A regular 20 - 45-minute high-intensity exercise will trigger positive endorphins, spark your metabolism, and build your resilience.

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Five Ways to Prime Your Brain for Optimal Performance Each Day

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The brain and the gut are linked and in constant communication, and about 100 million nerve cells reside in the gut.

Gut bacteria produce dopamine and similar neurotransmitters that are critical for mood, anxiety, concentration, and motivation, explaining why stomach disorders upset our mood and emotions.

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Gut Bacteria Can Influence Your Mood, Thoughts, and Brain

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