Vanity & Ego - Deepstash

Vanity & Ego

Vanity is excessive pride in or admiration of one’s own abilities, appearance, or achievements. There is a fine line between vanity and ego. Ego is a person’s sense of self-esteem or self-importance.

Vanity may be the devil’s favorite sin, but ego can be a trader's (or investor’s) worst nightmare.

Ego gets in the way of rational, logical, and reasonable conclusions because fear and greed can tug on our egos and cause us to make mistakes.

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MORE IDEAS FROM Leave Your Ego At The Door

Eliminating ego from all investment and trading decisions starts with ignoring the news, experts, and any inputs other than the herd behavior in markets.

Prices rise & fall to levels that many believe are not sustainable, following trends allows you to take advantage of their mistakes. Make a conscious decision that you will end the quest to pick a high or low in any market.

Ignore those voices in your head that appeal to your ego. Never forget that your view has no relevance whatsoever. Approach markets with a clear risk-reward plan.

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Following trends requires a special skill, which is no skill at all. Ignore expert advice, the news, and any other exogenous forces. The only tool necessary is a simple chart that displays the path of least resistance of the price.

The process is entirely objective, while fundamental analysis is completely subjective.

James Surowiecki argues that the many are smarter than the few and collective wisdom shapes business, economies, societies, and nations. A price chart is the roadmap of the crowd’s wisdom.

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Shorting an asset has the same ego dynamics. The market can take prices to levels on the up and downside that defy logic, reason, and rational analysis. There are many instances where prices rise to levels that make no sense.

Selling short and ignoring the power of the trend is dangerous and could be disastrous. Just because a market price rises to a high, does not mean it cannot go higher, a lot higher.

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On April 20, 2020, in the crude oil futures, came to 0$. Who wouldn’t want to buy crude oil at zero? After all, what is the risk?

As the history shows, a purchase of the expiring futures contract at zero looked more than ugly at negative $40 per barrel, the April 20, 2020 low.

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Human nature is a powerful force, but it deludes us to believe our gut instincts. When the price of an asset falls to a level where an investor or trader believes is a logical, reasonable, and rational low, they perceive the price as a bargain.

After an initial purchase, if the price continues to fall, our emotions cause a dangerous impulse. The little voice in our heads (ego) declares that the market is wrong. But it's never wrong.

The quest to buy the low in any market has everything to do with ego and little to do with making a profit.

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The annual chart of wood price has never traded over $493.50 per 1,000 board (1993 ATH) before 2017.

After falling to a low of $251.50 in early 2020 as the global pandemic gripped markets across all asset classes, the price took off on the upside.

At $660 in August 2020, it reached a new record high.

At $1,000 in September 2020, the price was irrational, and it more than halved in value, reaching a low of just over $490 in October 2020.

In May 2021, the price exploded to $1711.20 per 1,000 board before collapsing.

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RELATED IDEA

Heikin Ashi Pattern

HEIKIN - Average,  ASHI - Pace

Heikin Ashi pattern represents the average pace of the prices. These patterns are useful for getting an idea of the price trend.

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Learning how to be a better investor/ trader

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OMV is the price an asset would get in the marketplace, or the value the investment community gives to particular equity or business.

Market value is also used to refer to the market capitalization of a publicly-traded company. It is calculated by multiplying the number of its outstanding shares by the current share price.

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Many companies use the insights of financial managers and external consultants to manage their risk. A one-size-fits-all solution is not yet in existence when it comes to risk management.

These companies usually use derivatives like forwards, options, swaps and futures to offset their risk, but without a clear set of risk-management goals, the use of derivatives can increase the risk substantially.

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