When To Hire A Tutor For New Language - Deepstash

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The Hard, But Effective Way to Learn a New Language

When To Hire A Tutor For New Language

If you cannot find a learning buddy ( a partner that is willing to commit to only speaking in a foreign language with you), hire a tutor.

You can also opt for language exchange with people who want to learn your language.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

The Hard, But Effective Way to Learn a New Language

The Hard, But Effective Way to Learn a New Language

https://www.scotthyoung.com/blog/2016/11/29/learn-languages/

scotthyoung.com

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Key Ideas

When You Can’t Travel to Study A New Language

You can choose a friend who also wants to learn the language. Agree to talk in your language of choice at least once per day or whenever you talk to each other.

Your friend does not have to be a native speaker. But, 10% of your time should be speaking with an advanced or native speaker. Use a dictionary or other tools when you feel the need.

Learning a New Language: Preparation Time

  • Don't wait too long before you start practicing. Most people find it uncomfortable to speak a language poorly and avoid it. Don't think you will wait until you're "ready".
  • Going from zero to 100% will require some preparation. 25 - 50 hours are usually enough for a European language, 100 hours for harder Asian languages.

Learning a New Language: Immersion Traveling

If you want to do some practice before traveling to a country for a 100% immersion, do about 50% conversation practice and 50% with some beginner learning resource.

The non-speaking parts of learning are to supplement the conversation practice, not to be in place of it.

Speaking the Language With Zero Ability

Open a translating tool, type what you want to say, translate to the language you want to speak, try saying it to the other person.

If they understand you and say something you don't understand, ask them to write it down and use Google to translate it. It could be very awkward at first, but don't stress yourself too much about that.

Speaking the Language

This strategy of learning a new language only works if you speak in the language. If you are only able to spend 50% of your learning time in conversations, invest your time on the important aspects of the language that you can't focus on enough. It will be different for each language.

For instance, in Spanish, the conjugation system can be a bit overwhelming. Grammar exercise books might be useful. In Chinese, grammar is not so much the issue as pronunciation.

'I Don’t Want to Speak Yet'

Although it is scary and hard, immersive practice is by far the most effective. When the person you're speaking with sees that you don't understand, they will automatically try to simplify what they communicate.

If you don't want to speak yet, you can also try reading or watching movies, until you have a high listening comprehension.

The Best Strategy For Learning A New Language

  • Travel to a country that speaks the language.
  • Get a phrasebook and learn a few basic expressions.
  • Commit to only speaking in that language from the very beginning.
  • Use a dictionary to translate when you feel stuck.
  • Hire a local tutor.

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Know your motivation

If you don’t have a good reason to learn a language, you are less likely to stay motivated over the long-run.

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Find a partner

Finding some kind of partner on your language adventure will push both of you to always try just a little bit harder and stay with it.

It’s a really great way of actually going about it. You have someone with whom you can speak, and that’s the idea behind learning a new language.

Talk to yourself

When you have no one else to speak to, there’s nothing wrong with talking to yourself in a foreign language.

This can keep new words and phrases fresh in your mind. It also helps build up your confidence for the next time you speak with someone.

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