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Introverts, acting like an extrovert won't make you happier

Introverts

Introverts could benefit from learning to be more extraverted.

  • Those acting more extraverted report more positive emotions in the moment. 
  • Studies show that the introverted group's failure to report pleasure in retrospect could point to memory bias.
  • A less intense version, together with support and guidance to make behavioral changes habitual, could help introverts enjoy being more extraverted.

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Introverts, acting like an extrovert won't make you happier

Introverts, acting like an extrovert won't make you happier

https://www.fastcompany.com/90275053/introverts-acting-like-an-extrovert-wont-make-you-happier

fastcompany.com

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Key Ideas

Acting extraverted

Studies have found that prompting people, including introverts, to act more like an extravert makes them feel happier and truer to themselves.

Another team of researchers urges caution. Promoting any real-world applications of acting extraverted could be premature and potentially risky.

"Act more extraverted" 

One study on "acting like an extravert" found that introverts did not succeed in increasing their extraverted behavior as much as other participants.

  • Introverts did not benefit in retrospect from acting like an extravert.
  • They did not show momentary gains in authenticity.
  • Their retrospective fatigue levels seemed to increase with the "act extraverted" intervention.
  • Their experience of negative emotions increased.

Introverts

Introverts could benefit from learning to be more extraverted.

  • Those acting more extraverted report more positive emotions in the moment. 
  • Studies show that the introverted group's failure to report pleasure in retrospect could point to memory bias.
  • A less intense version, together with support and guidance to make behavioral changes habitual, could help introverts enjoy being more extraverted.

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