Workplace Zen — The 3 T’s - Deepstash

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Workplace Zen: Middle path at work

Workplace Zen — The 3 T’s

  • Think: Right thoughts produce right actions and right actions inspire others.
  • Talk: Dilute the speech about your accomplishments. If we stop talking about ourselves, we find much to learn about.
  • Toil: be very present in everything you do. Work hard when you have to, relax when it's time to relax.

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Workplace Zen: Middle path at work

Workplace Zen: Middle path at work

https://medium.com/age-of-awareness/workplace-zen-middle-path-at-work-25161c311a73

medium.com

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Key Ideas

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson

"To be yourself in a world that is constantly trying to make you something else is the greatest accomplishment."

The Bell Curve

The Bell Curve for performance appraisal: If there are 100 employees in a company, 10 employees are branded the top performers, 10 employees the poor performers and 80 percent are branded as average performers.
In a rating driven system, no employee can escape the bell curve. And these assumptions are failing to motivate employees.

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A Zen Parable
There was a man riding on a horse. When a man walking on the road asks him where he is going, the rider replies, “Why are you asking me? You should ask the horse.”

The ho...

Emotional Intelligence

The ability to monitor one's own and others' feelings and emotions to discriminate among them and to use this information to guide one's thinking and actions. -Salovey and Mayer (1990)

Emotional Mastery

It manifests itself in the kind of statements we make about ourselves, in relation to our emotional skills and success.

Qualities such as confidence, awareness and optimism, come under the umbrella of emotional intelligence. 

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Thinking like an actor

We can use performance techniques off stage to create a reality of our choosing.

Using acting techniques isn’t the same thing as manipulating people, or being phony or fake. Instead, i...

Know your big picture goal

An actor always performs with a clear purpose or motivation in mind. When you’re thinking about your next high-stakes situation, ask yourself the same question that actors ask when developing a character: “What’s my end goal?”

Think about your long-term objective, not just the immediate one. 

Think about the other person

... and how you want them to feel. The choices made by an actor during a performance — in speech and movement — are in the service of attaining their goal and achieving a specific impact on their audience.

Not everything you say or do is going to work, but if you can fluidly play one action after another in pursuit of your objective, it gives you this ability to improvise in the moment and be flexible.

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“Your sacred space is where you can find yourself again and again.”
Joseph Campbell
The Elements of Ritual
  • Create your environment, because it will affect your practice.
  • As you start, set an intention for the ritual.
  • Bring presence and full appreciation to the act.
  • Rituals can be a space for contemplating what’s important to you.
  • Close in gratitude for whatever you just did.
Rituals to Consider
  • Start your day with intention, gratitude and reflection.
  • Email & messages: Transform them into a ritual of connecting to others, of carefully considering issues, of crafting language.
  • Exercise: Bring it to be an act of love for your body, an act of connection to your environment, an act of full presence.
  • Meditation: Make it a simple ritual of full appreciation for the moment.
  • Sleep: Make it a time when you reflect on your day, prepare for your time of rest, slow down and appreciate your life.