deepstash

Beta

Get an account to save ideas & make your own & organize them how you wish.

STASHES TO GET YOU STARTED

© Brainstash, Inc

deepstash

Beta

Remember: You Don't Control What Happens, You Control How You Respond

Flatten The Curve

A few things we can do on our part to ‘flatten the curve’, prevent overloading of medical professionals and slow the spread of the virus:

  • Follow the advice from the World Health Organization.
  • Wash your hands, sneeze with caution and don’t touch your face.
  • Avoid shaking hands with others, or press buttons at public places.
  • Avoid large public gatherings, and cancel any non-essential travel and work meetings.
  • Don’t believe that you are the exception, and do not endanger others.
  • If you feel sick, or even if you don’t (but you believe you may have been exposed to the virus), it is best to stay at home. 
  • Practice social distancing, avoiding any social events, reducing face-to-face interactions.

48 SAVES


This is a professional note extracted from an online article.

Read more efficiently

Save what inspires you

Remember anything

IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

Remember: You Don't Control What Happens, You Control How You Respond

Remember: You Don't Control What Happens, You Control How You Respond

https://dailystoic.com/remember-you-dont-control-what-happens-you-control-how-you-respond/

dailystoic.com

4

Key Ideas

Control What You Can

Due to the new virus spreading across the globe, people are yelling on TV, hoarding toilet paper, perpetuating conspiracy theories, and acting racist. All of this is not helping stop the spread of the virus, which we cannot control at present.

We do not control what happens in our lives, but we can control how we respond.

Flatten The Curve

A few things we can do on our part to ‘flatten the curve’, prevent overloading of medical professionals and slow the spread of the virus:

  • Follow the advice from the World Health Organization.
  • Wash your hands, sneeze with caution and don’t touch your face.
  • Avoid shaking hands with others, or press buttons at public places.
  • Avoid large public gatherings, and cancel any non-essential travel and work meetings.
  • Don’t believe that you are the exception, and do not endanger others.
  • If you feel sick, or even if you don’t (but you believe you may have been exposed to the virus), it is best to stay at home. 
  • Practice social distancing, avoiding any social events, reducing face-to-face interactions.

Precautions During The Pandemic

  • Get into a complete Work From Home mode if it applies to you, and to other people who may report to you.
  • Cancel or postpone any upcoming events that you may be organizing, making them remote access/online only.
  • Help the elderly who may be at risk by going outside to buy essential commodities.
  • Do not visit elderly family members, to avoid any transmission to them.
  • Do not hoard essential goods, avoiding long lines at the stores, and definitely do not hoard medical resources.

Make Wise Decisions

  • Spend it productively and in self-improvement, by exercise and reading, and learning new skills at home.
  • Do not order online all at once, batching it up so as to not to stress the supply chains.
  • Do not spread any misinformation online on any social platform.
  • If you have symptoms and they do not die down, or you have trouble breathing, call your doctor or visit the hospital ER.
  • Cherish your loved ones, and ensure that no one is panicking.

EXPLORE MORE AROUND THESE TOPICS:

SIMILAR ARTICLES & IDEAS:

"The chief task in life is simply this: to identify and separate matters so that I can say clearly to myself which..."

Epictetus

How to respond

We can’t control the existence of the new virus but we can control how we respond.

  • Practice social distancing as much as possible.
  • Cancel or postpone any events that you have planned, or make them remote.
  • Practice safety measures, like washing your hands.
  • Help others in more vulnerable situations.
  • Hold off on visiting elderly friends or family members.
  • Don’t hoard.
  • Don’t tie up medical resources you don’t need.
  • Use your time wisely. Try a new hobby, or read up on something that interests you.
  • Batch your online orders to reduce the need for inefficient shipments.
  • Don’t spread misinformation.
  • If you get sick, isolate yourself at home as long as symptoms remain moderate.
  • Cherish the people you love.

Outbreak terms

  • Endemic is a disease that regularly infects humans, like the flu.
  • Pandemic is a worldwide spread of a new disease. 
  • Epidemic

Public health measures

  • Social distancing is a slew of tactics meant to keep people at a six feet distance from each other to keep droplets from an infected person's nose or mouth from landing on another person.
  • Quarantine is restricting the movement of, or isolating, people who might have been exposed to an infection but who aren't sick.
  • Isolation is separating people with confirmed or probable infections from other healthy people.
  • Lockdown is a term used by public health officials or lawyers to refer to anything from mandatory geographic quarantine to non-mandatory recommendations to shelter in place, to anything in between.
  • Cordon sanitaire is the restriction of movement in and out of a region or city.
  • Shelter in place is an order requesting people to stay at home, except for trips to the grocery store, pharmacies, and other essential errands.

Medical equipment

  • A ventilator is a machine that assists a patient in breathing when they have trouble breathing on their own.
  • PPE (Personal protective equipment), such as masks, gloves, face shields, and other gear that keeps health care workers from catching an infection.
  • A respirator is a face mask that seals around the mouth and filters out particles from the air before they are breathed in.
  • Surgical mask or face mask are loose-fitting masks that don't filter out all the particles but stop a wearer from spreading droplets of contagion when they sneeze or cough.

one more idea

What we know

The virus that is causing the current outbreak is a respiratory one and spreads through droplet infection.

  • There have been no known cases of the virus spreading through "smear" inf...

Contaminated surfaces

  • The virus can be detected in aerosols (airborne droplets smaller than five micrometers) for up to three hours.
  • On copper, for up to four hours.
  • On cardboard, for up to 24 hours.
  • On stainless steel or plastic, for up to three days.

The virus particles on any surface decrease rapidly at the start, then slowly approaches zero over time.

Touching or eating contaminated food

If a food worker coughs over your food while preparing it, although really gross, your risk of contracting the disease that way is minimal.

According to a 2018 overview of respiratory viruses, the virus reproduces along the respiratory tract. It is a different pathway than the digestive tract food follows when you swallow it.

Even if you handle contaminated food and then deposit the virus along your respiratory tract, it's highly unlikely to get sick this way.

6 more ideas