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The Real Risks and Human Biases behind the Panic | Mark Manson

The useful facts 

Now that the entire world is fighting the new virus, there are a few things which you might find useful to know:

  • Viruses like this have always existed and humans, in one way or another, came out of such experiences alive;
  • Crises of any type (economic, in the health system, etc.) most of the time lead to strengthening the systems in question;
  • Traumas that come from within seem to enable changes that were necessary, even if not urgent. So, instead of being frightened, better take care of yourself and your dear ones.

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The Real Risks and Human Biases behind the Panic | Mark Manson

The Real Risks and Human Biases behind the Panic | Mark Manson

https://markmanson.net/coronavirus-risks-and-biases

markmanson.net

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Key Ideas

The need to remain in quarantine

The last three months have been extremely difficult for the entire world since the new virus made its presence known. People are requested to remain in quarantine worldwide in order to enable the health care systems to treat correctly and progressively the infected individuals, so they do not get overwhelmed. 

So, if possible, we could try to change perspective and see this quarantine as a way of helping out our doctors to successfully accomplish their mission, while working from home and spending a bit more time with our beloved ones.

Health and the economic systems

During these dark days of the pandemic, countries chose to respond differently in front of their common enemy: while China made a goal out of saving as many lives as possible, the US seems to have decided on prioritizing the economic system over the health care one.

Our perception of the new virus

When faced with a danger like the current virus, individuals tend to have a reaction of whether extreme fear or one of denial. 

These reactions could be explained through a number of well-known facts such as our tendency to take into account the first-order effects, rather than the second- or third-order ones, the overall mentality which is mostly linear, not exponential and the focus on one-off solutions rather than trying to refine routines.

The useful facts 

Now that the entire world is fighting the new virus, there are a few things which you might find useful to know:

  • Viruses like this have always existed and humans, in one way or another, came out of such experiences alive;
  • Crises of any type (economic, in the health system, etc.) most of the time lead to strengthening the systems in question;
  • Traumas that come from within seem to enable changes that were necessary, even if not urgent. So, instead of being frightened, better take care of yourself and your dear ones.

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