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A Brain Exercise to Ease Anxiety

Calming an anxious mind

All you need are two pieces of paper, something to write with, and a timer:

  • At the top of page 1 write, “What I’m grateful for" and on top of page 2, “What I’m anxious about.”
  • For 7 seconds, focus on what you’re anxious about.
  • Shift your focus to what you’re grateful, for 17 seconds (the brain is very quick to feel anxious, and takes longer to experience gratitude).
  • Do 2 more sets, taking a few deep breaths between them. Most people find that by the third round, they experience less anxiety.

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IDEA EXTRACTED FROM:

A Brain Exercise to Ease Anxiety

A Brain Exercise to Ease Anxiety

https://forge.medium.com/how-to-deal-with-coronabrain-844c1cbb5801

forge.medium.com

3

Key Ideas

The anxious brain

With the threat of the new virus, we all feel anxiety, distracted and overwhelmed to a certain degree.
It’s exhausting to live this way, especially when we don’t know when things will get better.

Calming an anxious mind

All you need are two pieces of paper, something to write with, and a timer:

  • At the top of page 1 write, “What I’m grateful for" and on top of page 2, “What I’m anxious about.”
  • For 7 seconds, focus on what you’re anxious about.
  • Shift your focus to what you’re grateful, for 17 seconds (the brain is very quick to feel anxious, and takes longer to experience gratitude).
  • Do 2 more sets, taking a few deep breaths between them. Most people find that by the third round, they experience less anxiety.

Consciously shifting your focus

By consciously shifting from anxiety to gratitude, you’re reminding your brain who’s in charge.
You decide what thoughts to focus on, even when the news reports and panicked interactions with your peers would normally cause your mind to spiral.

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